Crypt Lake Hike

A few weeks ago I hiked one of Canada’s top 10 hikes, if not one of the best in the world. Crypt Lake, located in Waterton Lakes National Park, is a difficult 20.4 km hike with an elevation gain of 936 metres. To access the hiking trail you’ll need to take the Shoreline Ferry across Waterton Lake, about a 15 minute journey, which costs $30 per person.

After exiting the ferry the hike starts off right away with a bunch of switchbacks in a forested area. Grizzly bears frequent this area so this is a very critical hike to have bear spray on.

About 1/4 way through the hike you’ll finally emerge from the trees for a bit, where you’ll spot a waterfall off to your right. It’s quite pretty so be sure to snap a photo.

Continuing along the trail you’ll encounter numerous more switchbacks, with the treeline thinning out around 1/2 way along the hike. You’ll then see the second waterfall off into the distance.

About 3/4 of the way through the hike you come across a narrow ledge, about 300 metres long, which you must carefully traverse. After traversing the ledge you’ll find a small ladder, which you ascend, and then have a ~100 metre long tunnel which you must crawl through. Be careful to not smack your head like I did.

After emerging from the tunnel you’ll have a fairly technical 300 metres section with a bunch of chains. Just take your time as any mistake could result in a plunge to your death many hundreds of metres below. It’s not hard physically, but it is a bit nerve wracking.

After the chained section its a mostly flat hike to the lake. At Crypt Lake I changed into my bathing suit and carefully stepped into the freezing cold water. The water here was much colder than that of Carnarvon Lake the previous week.

After enjoying my time at the lake it was time to head back to catch the ferry back. There are two times the return ferry sails at. Make sure you get back in time, because it’s a tremendously long hike back (6+ hours) if you miss it. The times vary from season to season so be sure to check on their website. The hike took me just over 5 hours to complete.

Spring Hiking – Bears Hump, Cline River Falls, Siffleur Falls

This year I’ve completed 11 hikes so far, including the three that I completed last weekend.

First up was Bears Hump in Waterton Lakes National Park, in Southern Alberta. The hike is a short, but steep grind up 214 metres in only 1.25km. The effort is worth it as you’re greeted with a beautiful view of Waterton, and a view of the historic Prince of Wales Hotel, which was built in 1927. The hike took me only 42 minutes to complete the 2.5km round trip, although expect to take 1-1.5 hours to complete the hike. Today the hike is distinctly different than that of a few years ago, prior the the massive forest fire that rolled through the area in 2017.

The second hike was Cline River Falls, a 3.4km out-and-back hike with an elevation gain of 146 metres. The waterfall was still frozen, and had a bunch of crashing ice sounds as I was walking away from it. Cline River Falls is located in the same area as Abraham Lake, which I’ve visited multiple times in the past few winters. Abraham Lake is a photographers paradise because trapped methane causes frozen bubbles to form under the ice on the lake’s surface. The methane is formed from decaying plants on the lake bed. The methane gas ends up becoming trapped within the ice, in suspension, just below the surface of the lake as it begins to freeze. If you want to see what the area is like in the winter check out my post here.

The third hike was Siffleur Falls, just a ten minutes drive away from Cline River Falls. This hike was the most difficult of the three, albeit still somewhat easy. The hike was 14.2km with a total elevation gain of 369 metres. The hike starts out quite easy, and turns into a moderate difficulty towards the last 30% of the hike.

Carthew Alderson Trail Hike

Last Sunday I hiked the Carthew Alderson Trail in Waterton Lakes National Park. The hike starts below Cameron Falls in the town center and climbs up the left side of Cameron Falls before continuing down the river valley that is left completely burned from the 2017 Kenow Wildfire. New vegetation is already starting to grow, which is a great sign, and it looked quite beautiful with the new vegetation growing amongst the burned trees.

The first lake is Alderson Lake, which is about 8km along the trail. To get to this lake it is a slow steady elevation gain, and not too strenuous. Towards the lake the old vegetation starts to emerge, as the entire river valley wasn’t destroyed from the fire. I found Alderson Lake to be the most beautiful of the three lakes, with its deep vivid blue colour.

The second lake is Lower Carthew Lake, which is quite the steady 3km grind to get to.

Continuing along another 1km or so is Upper Carthew Lake. This lake is quite beautiful and if you look bardwards towards the Lower Lake you get quite the spectacular view.

The hike took me about 4.75 hours to complete the 20km, 997 metres of elevation gain.

Stay tuned as next week I’ll be going to Kelowna with Julie to soak up some sun, drink some delicious wine, and eat some delicious food!

Before I go; I thought i’d share the beautiful picture of a double rainbow that we were blessed with in the evening after my hike.

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