Spring 2022 Update – Calgary Zoo, Kelowna, Vancouver

It’s been a busy few months since I returned from Portugal! I’ve been working a fair amount between my two jobs, which took me to Vancouver and Kelowna. I also did videography at a wedding at the Fairmont Palliser, a grad photoshoot, and visited the Calgary Zoo.

Vancouver

In early May I visited Vancouver for an LNG Conference that my company was attending. While the majority of the time was spent working, I did have a few hours to explore the city and look at architecture. I’ll dive a bit into the history of each building below.

885 West Georgia Street, also known as the HSBC Canada Building, is a 23-storey building that was designed by WZMH Architects, and constructed between 1984 and 1986. The lobby features a large magnetically induced pendulum that was designed by Alan Storey.

Next door is Hotel Georgia, a 12-storey historic hotel that was opened in 1927. It was designed by Robert T. Garrow and John Graham Senior. The hotel originally had 313 rooms, however they were reduced to 155 after a renovation in 2011.

750 Hornby Street is home to the Vancouver Art Gallery. The building, originally built as a provincial courthouse, has been occupied by the museum since 1983.

Commodore Ballroom was opened in December 1929 as the Commodore Cabaret. It remained open until 1996, when it was closed for a $3.5 million renovation and reopened in 1999. This is a beautiful example of Art Deco style, and was designed by George Conrad Reifel and H.H. Gillingham.

The Orpheum, opened in 1927, was originally a vaudeville house on Theatre Row. It was designed by Scottish architect Marcus Priteca. The theatre has capacity for 2672 people. Following the end of the vaudeville’s heyday in the early 1930’s, the Orpheum became a movie house under Famous Players ownership, however it occasionally hosted live events from time-to-time. In 1973 Famous Players decided it wanted to gut the inside and changed it into a multiplex, however after much protesting it was stopped, and the City of Vancouver purchased the theatre for $7.1 million. The Orpheum closed in November 1975, renovated, and re-opened in April 1977 as the permanent home of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.

The Vogue Theatre is a beautiful Art Deco style building that was built in 1941 as a movie house. It was operated by Odeon Theatres until 1984, when the company was acquired into Cineplex Odeon. In 1998 the building was restored. In 2010 the building was converted into an event space. The theatre has a capacity of 1280 people.

The Vancouver Public Library Central Branch building, also known as Library Square, is located at 350 West Georgia Street. The building was built between 1993 and 1995 for a cost of $107 million. The building, designed by Moshe Safdie, Richard Archambault, and Barry Downs, is covered in granite, which was quarried in Horsefly, British Columbia.

The Queen Elizabeth Theatre, built in 1959, was the former home of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, before it moved to The Orpheum. The Queen Elizabeth Theatre is now home of the Vancouver Opera and Ballet BC. The main auditorium can seat 2765 people, and the attached Playhouse Theatre can hold 668 people.

BC Place, built between 1981 and 1983 is a multi-purpose stadium that can seat 54500 people. It is home of the BC Lions, which is Vancouver’s CFL football team. The stadium roof is air-supported, and is the largest of its kind in the world.

Science World is a science center housed in a geodesic dome that was built between 1984 and 1985 for Vancouver’s Expo 86′ World’s Fair. The building, designed by Bruno Freschi, served as the fair’s Expo Center. At the end of Expo 86′ the building was repurposed into a science center.

The Pacific Central Station was built in 1917 by the Canadian Northern Railway as the terminus of its line to Edmonton. It was originally named False Creek Station, and was designed by Pratt and Ross.

St. James Anglican Church is a unique church built between 1935 and 1937. The concrete church has a combination of styles ranging from Art Deco, Romanesque Revival, Byzantine Revival, to Gothic Revival.

43 Powell Street, a six-storey heritage building that was built between 1908 and 1909 by Parr and Fee Architects. The building is designed in a flatiron style, similar to the famous flatiron building in New York. The building was originally a hotel named Hotel Europe, however in 1983 it was converted into an affordable housing complex.

The Gas Town Steam Clock was built in 1977 by Raymond Saunders and Doug Smith. It resembles something out of the Victorian era, and is located in Vancouver’s original Gastown district. It receives steam from a series of pipes connected to a generating plant at Georgia and Beatty Streets. The steam system provides heat the the majority of the downtown core, similar to how New York City’s steam system operates. This clock is rumored to be only one of two steam clocks ever constructed, because of their inherent inaccuracies. The first steam clock was build by Englishman John Inshaw in 1859, apparently to lure in customers to his tavern.

128 West Cordova Street, was originally the site of the Woodward’s Building, which was constructed in 1903 for the Woodward’s Department Store, a premier shopping store back in its heyday. I remember my parents shopping at a Woodward’s store when I was a kid. Woodward’s ended up going bankrupt and was sold to the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1993. After Woodward’s went bankrupt the building sat vacant until 2012, when a redevelopment plan was initiated. Part of the redevelopment plan included the construction of a new high rise mixed-use building called W43. The building stands 122 metres (401 feet) tall and is another flatiron style building with an exterior steel skeleton, which evokes the steel construction method used in Vancouver in the early 20th century. The rest of the original block was retained. The original Woodward’s building had a “W” neon sign that resembled that of a mini Eiffel Tower. It was replicated with modern LED lights and re-installed on one of the buildings on the block in 2010.

Credit: Paul Warchol. Creative Commons Use. Photo Taken 2014.

The Dominion Building, located at 207 West Hastings, is Vancouver’s first steel-framed high-rise. Standing 53 metres (175 feet) tall, this 13-storey building was the tallest commercial building in the British Empire when it was completed in 1910. The building took just over 4 years to complete. The building was designed by J.S. Helyer and Son, and is built in Second Empire architecture style, which evolved from French Renaissance style.

Harbour Center is a 147 metre 28-storey tall skyscraper with a circular 360° lookout tower that overlooks the central business district. The brutalist style building was designed by WZMH Architects, and was opened in 1977. The building is somewhat unique as the glass elevators to the observation deck ride on the outside of the building. The building has been featured in a few movies such as The 6th Day, and Blade: Trinity, as well as a few TV Shows such as the X-Files and MacGyver.

The MacMillan Bloedel Building is 27-storey concrete tower with offset halves, tapered walls, and deep recessed windows. This brutalism style (modernist style) structure was designed by Arthur Erickson, Geoff Massey, and Francis Donaldson, and was built between 1968 and 1969.

1285 W Pender Street, also known as the Evergreen Building, is a beautiful multi-terraced building covered in greenery. The building was designed by Arthur Erickson, and built in 1980.

1333 W Georgia Street, also known as the Qube, is a very unique brutalism style (modernist style) building constructed in 1969. The building, designed by Rhone and Iredale Architects, looks like a floating cube, and is supported by a strong concrete core. The Qube was originally constructed as a commercial building, but was later converted to condominiums in 2006.

1919 Beach Avenue, also known as Eugenia Place, is a 19-storey condominium building that overlooks the shoreline of English Bay. The building, designed by Caleb Chan, was constructed in 1991 and features a 37 foot Pin Oak tree on its rooftop in a specially designed circular cauldron. The oak tree on the top of the building is a metaphorical representation of the tall forests of Cedar and Douglas Fir that once stood there. The building is unique in that there is only one suite per floor, with the exception of the top two suites each occupying two floors.

The Bloedel Conservatory is a beautiful domed conservatory and aviary that was opened in 1969. It features of 100 birds, and 500 plant species. It was built as part of a group of centennial projects to celebrate Canada’s 100th anniversary. The triodetic dome frame was manufactured entirely in Ottawa and ship across the country. The structural framework only took 10 days to erect, however the entire dome and plaza took 18 months to complete. The dome was facing a large budget shortfall in 2009, and was slatted for closure after the 2010 Olympics, but after numerous fundraisers and setting up an association, the building was saved, and is still open to the public for a nominal fee.

Vancouver City Hall is a beautiful Art Deco style building that was constructed between 1935 and 1936. It was designed by Fred Townley and Matheson. The building has a twelve-storey tower with a clock on the top.

355 Burrard Street, also known as the Marine Building, is in my opinion one of the most beautiful Art Deco skyscrapers I have seen. It was completed in 1930, and was the tallest skyscraper in the city at that time. The building, designed by McCarter & Nairne, stands 98 metres (321 feet) tall and is comprised of 22 floors.

I also saw some unique street art while I was walking around.

Kelowna

In early January I started working part-time for another company based in Kelowna. In mid-May I spent a few days in Kelowna visiting with my friend Krystylyn, and meeting my colleagues. During my trip Krystylyn and I went on a few hikes.

The first hike we completed was called Fintry Falls. The hike starts off at the historic Fintry Octagonal Dairy Barn, which was constructed in 1924. The unique barn was owned by James Cameron Dun-Waters who developed the farm on the Fintry Estate between 1909 and 1939. The barn was built to house his prized herd of Ayshire cows.

About 100 metres from the barn is the site of a former powerhouse, which James built in 1912 to harness the power from Shorts Creek to provide power for his estate house, barn, and sawmill. I’ll dive into detail about that a bit later.

The hike continues up a few hundred stairs to a beautiful view of Fintry Falls, where Krystylyn and I stopped to admire the views, before venturing further up the trail.

After climbing more stairs we came across some narrow concrete ledges, which we crossed before finding the remains of a wooden suspension bridge that had fallen apart. James had built a dam across a narrow gorge in the Shorts Creek, to where it channeled water into a reservoir. The reservoir then transported water in a large wood-stave, wire-wrapped pipe across this suspension bridge, and over those narrow concrete ledges we had crossed, and then down the hill to the powerhouse. The water pressure available at the powerhouse was apparently around 150psi.

The second hike we completed was called Turkey Vulture Loop, which is located int he Rose Valley Regional Park. The hike progresses through a sparse forest, up some hills, before emerging on a beautiful view of Kelowna.

Calgary Zoo

In late May I visited the Calgary Zoo. There was a few new animals including a Tapir, a baby Gorilla, and a baby Porcupine. I did manage to get a great picture of the Tapir, however wasn’t able to see the baby Gorilla, and didn’t get a great photo of the Porcupine. I was successful in finally getting a bunch of nice photos of the Red Panda’s though, which I’ve been trying to get for years!

Be sure to check back soon, as hiking season has begun, and I’m off to Bali, Indonesia in July!

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Chester Lake Fall 2020

A few weeks ago Julie and I completed the hike to Chester Lake. The hike to Chester Lake is about 10km return, and a moderate climb up 424 metres through a subalpine forest, before you emerge in a clearing where there is an absolutely stunning lake.

About 2/3 of the way up it started to snow, and by the time we got to the lake there was a good 1.5-2 inch’s of snow on the ground. We had lunch while we were at the top and walked partially around the lake. It took us about 3 hours to complete the hike. I previously completed this hike solo on July 9th 2020. You can check out that blog post here.

On the way back down we saw some people ascending a mountain nearby. Considering the conditions presented to us at the time we thought this was dangerous.

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Iceberg Lake

Two weeks ago I completed my favourite hike of the year to Iceberg Lake in Banff National Park.

The 12.1km hike / scramble starts out at the Num-Ti-Jah Lodge parking lot. You head towards Bow Glacier Falls and turn off towards the ACC Bow Hut. You’ll know you’ve arrived at the turn-off for the ACC Bow Hut because you’ll see a huge chock rock that bridges the bow river. Hop on top of it, being careful, and cross the rock.

Follow the trail up and over, and then you’ll head down to a stream that flows into the Bow River. In fact you’ll also be able to see Bow Glacier Falls in the distance. When you get to the stream you’ll have to take your boots off. The water is extremely cold, but don’t go too fast as it’s extremely uneven and you don’t want to hurt yourself.

You”ll then follow a winding path on the left and will eventually come to a reasonably wide ledge on a cliff face. It’s honestly not that scary as long as you just keep away from the cliff.

Continue following the well established trail until you come out of the mini sub-alpine forest.

You can then either climb the loose rock ahead of you to the prominent cairn at the summit, or follow the moraine edge up. The moraine edge looked really sketchy to me so I choose to just go up the loose rock. It’s easier coming down than it is going up, so don’t be too concerned.

Once on top you’ll be presented with the astounding beauty of Iceberg Lake. I spent some time taking some videos and photos of the lake, before carefully going close to the top of the waterfall. Be extremely careful here as one slip and you’ll fall 125 metres to your death.

I completed the Bow Glacier Falls hike back in 2015 with my friend Carissa before I started blogging. Here’s a picture of what it looks like below.

The hike took me a total of 3.75 hours, but I’m sure I could’ve completed it in 3.25 hours as I was taking my time.

The next post will be part of my multi-part Kelowna series which starts this weekend.

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Headwall Lakes Hike

Last weekend I hiked two hikes; Headwall Lakes and Iceberg Lake, which were my 20th and 21st hikes of the year if you count all the walk/hikes I completed with Julie in Wells Gray Provincial Park. The first hike I completed was Headwall Lakes. Headwall Lakes is a moderate difficulty 16km hike that has 652 metres of elevation gain. The hike starts in the same parking lot as Chester Lake, a hike which I completed a few weeks ago and you can view here. The start of the hike is an easy 3km saunter along an access road, before venturing into the forest. The forest trail was quite tight in some areas so I decided to put on my pantlegs on my Columbia Silver Ridge Convertible Pants (which I highly recommend by the way). 2020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 012020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 02 About 5.5 km into the hike I was about to emerge onto the rock scree when I heard the roar of a bear!!! It made all the hair on the back of neck stand up, and I cautiously turned back to head towards the parking lot, while announcing my presence loudly. 2020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 03 About 10 minutes on my journey back I ran into a group of 7 male geologists and told them about my experience. They said that with a group of 8 the bear wouldn’t be scared of us and asked if I wanted to tag along. In the group there were 2 Rob’s, 3 Ian’s, and a cool old Romanian guy who I chatted with for a bit. I learned a bit about the different rock formations and had a great time with them. After about an hour I split apart from the group and blazed my own trail towards the first lake. The wind started to pickup towards the first lake, and at times I was actually starting to get a bit cold, so I decided to put on my hoodie. Emerging at the first lake I was completely awe-struck at the sheer beauty of the scenery around me! 2020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 062020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 082020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 09 At the first lake I took a break for some water and a sandwich before venturing up towards the second lake. The climb up towards the second lake was beside a beautiful waterfall with alpine flowers growing up alongside the waterfall edge. 2020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 10 Gazing backwards towards the first lake I was presented with such an astounding view that I couldn’t help myself from continuously looking back at. 2020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 11 Finally, I arrived at the second lake, which was quite the different perspective. It wasn’t as beautiful as the first lake, but was still pretty in its own accord. 2020-08-14 Headwall Lakes Hike 12 After taking a rest at the top I ventured back towards the car, without any more bear drama! The total time on the hike was 4.25 hours, but if it were not for my encounter with the bear it probably would have been closer to 3.5 hours. Stay tuned for the next installment in my hiking series; Iceberg Lake! If you like the content that I produce and want to donate money towards the upkeep of my site, or buy me a cup of coffee please feel free to contribute towards it. I really appreciate it.

Twin Falls Hike

On July 19th 2020 I completed the Twin Falls hike in Yoho National Park. The 18km hike took me just over 4 hours to complete. The start of the hike begins at the Takakkaw Falls parking lot. The hike is very gradual and isn’t strenuous until about 5km mark. After that it’s a slow climb to the top. The total elevation gain is 846 metres.

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The trail passes through the Takakkaw Falls Campground, where it exits to the open stony plain of the Yoho Valley.

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A few kilometres along the trail you come to a T intersection. If you turn right and walk about 150 metres you are presented with a beautiful view of Angel’s Staircase Falls merging with the Yoho River.

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Another few kilometres along you come across another side trail to a quiet beautiful lake called Duchesnay Lake.

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Continuing further along to the trail you cross a bridge and come to Laughing Falls where you’re presented with two options to get to the Twin Falls. You can go left (the steep route) or right (the gradual route). I prefer a gradual climb, and a steep decent over the inverse so I chose to go right.

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Continuing along the gradual climb up to Twin Falls you follow along the river that Twin Falls Dump into. So far the entire hike has been in a covered forest, which provided shelter against the sun.

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Finally I arrived at Twin Falls. The view was absolutely stunning. I managed to grab a few photos before it started to rain.

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I continued along the trail to where I’m presented with the beautiful but aging Twin Falls Chalet. The tea house currently isn’t open because it was controversially closed last year. A woman named Fran Drummond had been operating the chalet for the last 57 years when Parks Canada decided to lock her out of the chalet and cancel her lease in 2019. You can read more on the controversial topic here.

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Continuing further along the hike you come to a beautiful sub-alpine lake called Marpole Lake, where you emerge from the forest and continue along a very rocky pathway for a few kilometres, before a steep decent alongside Laughing Falls and meet up with the original trail split to head back towards the trailhead.

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This was one of the most unique and enjoyable hikes that I have been on in Canada. I was presented with such a wide variety of views, and the trail difficulty was varied, which I appreciated. The views of Twin Falls was absolutely stunning and is a great place to have lunch, as long as it isn’t pouring rain.

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Hamilton Lake Hike

On July 17th 2020 Dad and I drove to Emerald Lake to do some hiking. Dad decided to hike around Emerald Lake, and I completed the 9.3 km (return) hike to Hamilton Lake in the beautiful Yoho National Park. The hike has 864 metres of elevation gain, so it’s quite the grind up to the top.  The hike took me just under 3 hours to complete, but the sticker time on the hike is closer to 5 hours. I would budget 4.5-5.5 hours.

When we arrived at Emerald Lake it was just after 10am and the water was completely still. I’ve never seen it in this mirror-finish before and was quite in awe.

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After taking in the beauty of the lake I started the grind up towards Hamilton Lake. There was a few scenic portions towards the top, including a waterfall, but the majority of the hike was in the woods.

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At the top you’re presented with a gorgeous view of the pristine glacier fed lake. It had only thawed a few days prior and was extremely cold to the touch. Throughout the hike I hadn’t run into a single person on this entire hike, which allowed me to enjoy the trail all by myself.

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Dad and I met in Emerald Lodge for a beer afterwards. our timing was near perfect; within 7 minutes. We both enjoyed an IPA beer in the lodge, which was quite empty due to the lack of tourism in the area because of COVID-19.

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Rummel Lake & Chester Lake Hikes

Last weekend I hiked to Rummel Lake and Chester Lake. Both of the hikes are within a 5 minutes drive of one another in the beautiful Kananaskis Provincial Park.

The hike to Rummel Lake is about 11km return. The trail is a moderate climb up 441 metres through a subalpine forest, before you emerge at the beautiful lake. Even in early July the lake was still partially frozen, as its surrounded by mountains all around. I loved the beautiful reflection that the nearly still water of the lake provided. It took me about 2 hours to complete the hike.

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The hike to Chester Lake is about 10km return. The trail is a moderate climb up 424 metres through a subalpine forest, before you emerge in a clearing where there is an absolutely stunning lake. The lake was also still partially frozen, as its also surrounded by mountains all around. It also took me about 2 hours to complete the hike.

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Boom Lake Hike

On May 29th 2020 my friend Sara and I completed the hike to Boom Lake. The 10.3 km long and 543 metre of elevation gain hike to boom lake is on a well maintained trail through a luscious forest. It took us about four hours return, but I imagine you could easily shave off 30-45 minutes in the summer when you don’t have the snow to deal with. The first 45 minutes into the hike there was no snow and it was pretty smooth sailing. The next 30-45 minutes was ankle deep snow, for which we put our crampons on. The last 30-45 minutes to the lake had knee deep snow. We decided to wear our gaiters for this, but my feet still ended up getting soaked.

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We saw some canine or cat footprints that were larger than a dog, but smaller than a bear. I am very glad that we had our bear spray with us. The views at the still lake were absolutely amazing! We had lunch at the lake, before returning back to our car.

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Glacier Lake Hike

On June 5th 2020 I completed my fifth hike of the year. This hike was to Glacier Lake. The 16.9 km long and 870 metre of elevation gain hike to boom lake is on a well maintained trail mostly through a luscious forest.

About 1 km along the trail there is a bridge that crossed the North Saskatchewan River. The waters are a beautiful turquoise blue. After another 1 km or so you come to a pair of red chairs with a beautiful overlook of the Howse River valley.

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After a quick break at the chairs the trail follows the river flat and then climbs up along a creek. There are numerous rivers crossings on privative log bridges.

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As you begin the descent from the summit watch for signs on the trees and look to your right to see a tree blazed to commemorate the 1928 Topographical Survey, which was completed by Morrison Bridgland.

At the lake there is a campsite with a historic hut, a place for a campfire, and some picnic benches. I had some lunch here before returning to my car. The hike took me a total of 4 hours to do the return trip. This area is prime bear territory between July and August, due to berries along the river, so be sure to bring bear spray, an air horn, and a knife.

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Be sure to check back soon for my next adventure. If you like the content that I produce and want to donate money towards the upkeep of my site, my travel, or buy me a cup of coffee please feel free to contribute towards it. I really appreciate it.

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Birds, Coal Mines, Gas Plants, Portraits, Oh My!!!

It’s been exactly a month since I last posted on my blog. Where have I been? I’ve been fairly busy taking pictures of Birds, Portraits, Gas Plants, and Portraits during this COVID-19 pandemic. As most of you know COVID-19 has making its rounds around the globe, infecting over 5.2 million people so far and taking the lives of 335,000 people as of the writing of this article on May 21st 2020. I was supposed to take an Eastern Europe roadtrip starting on March 18th 2020, ending on April 7th 2020. This trip has been postponed until further notice, but I will complete it when it is safe and socially acceptable to do so.

Since my last post I drove east of Red Deer on April 23rd to a work site to take some drone photos of an oil processing facility. My drone props suffered a catastrophic failure and the drone fell 45 metres to the ground, but lived to tell the tale.

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On April 26th I visited the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary with my friend Hadrian. I managed to get a few photos that I was fairly happy with.

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On May 1st I drove out to the Atlas Coal Mine to take some photos. This ended up being an expensive day as I obtained two driving infractions on the way out which will cost me $616 and 6 demerit points. I was falsely accused of a few things, which I will be fighting in court. Anyways look I got a few useable photos…

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On May 2nd Julie and I visited the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary with my friend Hadrian. I again got some photos I was fairly happy with.

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I also visited my parents that weekend and got some cute pictures of their dogs.

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On May 9th Julie and I visited Carburn Park with Hadrian and his wife Stacey. I got a few useable shots and ended up meeting a lovely lady named Cindy who had a beautiful Burnese pupyy named Charlotte. Cindy kept in touch with us and I ended up doing some photo’s for her family on May 17th, but I won’t be posting them to respect their privacy.

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On May 16th my friend Sara and I drove out to Kananaskis to attempt to hike Jumpingpound Mountain, but when we arrived there was still over 2 feet of snow on the ground. We will wait a few more weeks before we start the hiking season since this winter we received a fair amount of snow in the mountains.

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With hiking season fast approaching make sure to stay tuned for beautiful landscape pictures. I have plans to complete roughly 20 hikes this year.

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