Boom Lake Hike

On May 29th 2020 my friend Sara and I completed the hike to Boom Lake. The 10.3 km long and 543 metre of elevation gain hike to boom lake is on a well maintained trail through a luscious forest. It took us about four hours return, but I imagine you could easily shave off 30-45 minutes in the summer when you don’t have the snow to deal with. The first 45 minutes into the hike there was no snow and it was pretty smooth sailing. The next 30-45 minutes was ankle deep snow, for which we put our crampons on. The last 30-45 minutes to the lake had knee deep snow. We decided to wear our gaiters for this, but my feet still ended up getting soaked.

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We saw some canine or cat footprints that were larger than a dog, but smaller than a bear. I am very glad that we had our bear spray with us. The views at the still lake were absolutely amazing! We had lunch at the lake, before returning back to our car.

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Glacier Lake Hike

On June 5th 2020 I completed my fifth hike of the year. This hike was to Glacier Lake. The 16.9 km long and 870 metre of elevation gain hike to boom lake is on a well maintained trail mostly through a luscious forest.

About 1 km along the trail there is a bridge that crossed the North Saskatchewan River. The waters are a beautiful turquoise blue. After another 1 km or so you come to a pair of red chairs with a beautiful overlook of the Howse River valley.

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After a quick break at the chairs the trail follows the river flat and then climbs up along a creek. There are numerous rivers crossings on privative log bridges.

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As you begin the descent from the summit watch for signs on the trees and look to your right to see a tree blazed to commemorate the 1928 Topographical Survey, which was completed by Morrison Bridgland.

At the lake there is a campsite with a historic hut, a place for a campfire, and some picnic benches. I had some lunch here before returning to my car. The hike took me a total of 4 hours to do the return trip. This area is prime bear territory between July and August, due to berries along the river, so be sure to bring bear spray, an air horn, and a knife.

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Be sure to check back soon for my next adventure. If you like the content that I produce and want to donate money towards the upkeep of my site, my travel, or buy me a cup of coffee please feel free to contribute towards it. I really appreciate it.

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Banded Creek Connector Bench Hike

As most of you know COVID-19 has making its rounds around the globe, infecting over 7.05 million people so far and taking the lives of 403,000 people as of the writing of this article on June 7th 2020. I was supposed to take an Eastern Europe roadtrip starting on March 18th 2020, ending on April 7th 2020. This trip has been postponed until further notice, but I will complete it when it is safe and socially acceptable to do so.

Despite these sobering statistics Canada has started to re-open the economy, and with that they have also re-opened the Provincial and National Parks. On May 24th 2020 Julie and I decided to go on a moderate difficulty hike called “Banded Creek Connector Bench” in the Bragg Creek area. This hike was my third hike of the season. I typically have a goal of completing 20 hikes per year, so I’m well under way already.

The hike was a 6.1 km long hike with 222 metres of elevation gain. It took us approximately 2.5 hours to complete, including a fifteen minute rest at the small wetland area at the end, and another fifteen minute rest at the small lake a bit further along. The trail conditions were fair, with a few muddy spots in the middle.

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Next week I plan on going on a hike with my friend Sara to Boom Lake. Stay tuned!

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Brooks Aqueduct, Red Rock Coulee, High Level Bridge

As most of you know COVID-19 has making its rounds around the globe, infecting over 1.34 million people so far and taking the lives of 74,000 people as of the writing of this article on April 6th 2020. I was supposed to take an Eastern Europe roadtrip starting on March 18th 2020, ending on April 7th 2020. This trip has been postponed until further notice, but I will complete it when it is safe and socially acceptable to do so. In the meantime I am following government guidelines and maintaining physical distancing from others.

Last weekend I needed to get out to get some fresh air. I didn’t want to be around others so I decided to drive around Southern Alberta with Julie to take some drone shots of some of my favorite places, as well as explore something I hadn’t heard of (Red Rock Coulee) until I did some reading online. This 800km journey was completed in my new to me 2018 Toyota Prius PRIME, which I picked up about a month ago. I’ve already put 3000 kilometers on it, and it costs just pennies per kilometer to drive. The average fuel consumption is under 4l/100km.

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First stop was Brooks Aqueduct, which is a defund aqueduct originally built by the irrigation division of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company in 1914. It was made of reinforced concrete and provided irrigation to the area for over 30 years. It had a capacity of 25 cubic metres (900 cubic feet) per second and provided water to over 113,000 hectares of land. Water to the aqueduct was provided by the Bassano Dam, and built as part of the same project on the Bow River. In 1934 the aqueduct was refurbished. In 1969 the Alberta and Canadian governments assumed the responsibility of maintaining the aqueduct, but it had already fallen into disrepair and was shut down. It is now considered a National Historic Site of Canada and is fenced off. I was very lucky in 2011 when I was able to walk on top of the Aqueduct before it was closed to the public.

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Our second stop was Red Rock Coulee, a Provincial Natural Area near Medicine Hat, Alberta. The area features large spherical red coloured boulders, some measuring up to 2.5 metres (10 feet) in diameter. These formations were formed from the erosion, exposing the concretions of shale, sandstone, siltstone, bentonite, and brown ironstone. This place reminded me of the Devil’s Marbles on my trip to Australia in 2016.

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The third and final stop was High Level Bridge in Lethbridge. I decided to fly my drone here, albeit it being a tremendously windy day. I regret my decision later, because it ended up crashing after only 5 minutes of flying due to not being able to combat the wind. Damage is minimal, but I have to wait until Amazon delivers me some new propellers. High Level Bridge was constructed between 1907 and 1909 at a cost of $1.3 million by the Canadian Pacific Railway company. The 95 metre tall bridge spans 1.6 km over the Oldman River near Lethbridge, Alberta and provided a solution to extremely steep grades that hampered railway operations for the company. The grade was reduced to only 0.4 percent and saved over 8.5 km of track. Transport of the steel to the bridge required 645 railways cars, and another 40 cars contained the equipment required to build the bridge. The bridge is the largest railway structure in Canada, and the largest of its type in the world.

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A video of this adventure can be found on my YouTube channel here.

Wash your hands religiously, maintain social distancing to flatten the curve, and stay safe. See you soon!

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Rocky Mountains Winter 2019

Winter is coming… wait… winter is here!!! Over the last few weeks we have visited many snowy locations in the Rocky Mountains including; Emerald Lake, Lake Louise, Banff, Johnston Canyon, and Kananaskis (Rawson Lake). The crisp winter air certainly takes your breath away, but the views do too! Take a look at the absolutely splendid views that we have right in our very own backyard!

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Buller Pass Hike

On August 3rd 2019 my friend Carissa and I completed the Buller Pass hike in Spray Valley Provincial Park. It’s a 10.1km out & back style hike with 778 metres of elevation gain. The majority of the elevation gain is at the end, but the views are worth it. It took us about 6 hours to complete this amazing hike. The hike starts out in a heavily tree’d forest and eventually breaks through to some meadows before getting into some more burnt out tree’s from a forest fire from 2011/2012. After passing through those trees you come to the pass, which is about 250 metres of elevation gain, and it definitely makes you work for it. The loose shale makes it difficult to gain much traction. After reaching the peak you can see the beautiful view of Ribbon Lake below. We had some lunch at the top before turning back towards the car. I highly recommend this amazing hike!

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Lillian Lake & Galatea Lakes Hike

Last weekend my father and I completed the Lillian Lake & Galatea Lakes Hike located in Kananaskis Provincial Park, Alberta. We started the hike rather late in the day (12:30pm) because I was hanging out at the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary in the morning with my friend Brenda.

The total hike is 16.9km and has 870 metres of elevation gain. The trail to Lillian Lake (the first lake) was fairly easy to moderate, with a good mix of level ground or just a slight include in the first 75% of the trail. The trail got steeper towards the lake.

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My dad and I parted ways here and I proceeded to go up to Lower Galatea Lake, which was quite the steep incline up some shale. I ran into a co-worker on the way up. Once reaching Lower Galatea Lake my breath was completely taken away by the raw beautiful of this beautiful turquoise lake. It was absolutely amazing! I ended up chatting with a few people at the lake while eating lunch, and asked them to take my photo since I don’t really do selfies.

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I didn’t really feel like proceeding further to the Upper Galatea Lake so I head back town towards the car, where my dad was waiting. Total hiking time to the Lower Galatea Lake was 3.25 hours from the parking lot. The return time was about half of that (1.5 hours). Total time was 4.75 hours. If you decide to go to the Upper Galatea Lake the round trip time is about 5.5 hours.

Check back shortly when I post about the best photo’s I’ve taken at the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary this year.