Frank Lake

Over the past few weeks I’ve visited Frank Lake a few times; once with my friend Hadrian, and once with my girlfriend Julie. Frank Lake is a restored wetland area located about 45 minutes Southeast of Calgary, which is my hometown.

The earliest recorded history of the lake dates back to 1883 from Survey reports referring to it under multiple names such as Begg Lake, Green Lake, and Windsor Lake. It was eventually named Frank Lake, after Bishop Christopher Frank, who established a nearby Mormon settlement known as Frankburg. In the early days the lake was used by hunters, who hunted waterfowl, and then shipped the waterfowl to the USA by rail. Eventually feedlots were established in the area and the east side of the lake was used for drinking water.

The lake became extremely dry in the 1930’s, 1940’s and again in the 1980’s (more on that later). This was also in contrast to massive flooding which occurred in the 1950’s and 1970’s. During the floods in the 1950’s Ducks Unlimited Canada, a conservation organization, constructed a drainage ditch to try to stabilize the water level. Further work on the wetlands occurred in 1975 when a weir was constructed on the south end of the lake. Sadly the lake became dry again in the 1980’s and it was decided that a pipeline was to be built to bring treated waste water from High River and the nearby Cargill meat packing plant to ensure a constant supply of water. One obscure note is that during World War 2 the area in the middle of the dry lake bed was used as an alternate landing field for the RCAF Station in High River.

During my visits I saw a bunch of beautiful birds, and even some rare birds. I saw a Black-Crowned Night Heron, some Red-Winged  Black Birds, some Yellow-Headed Blackbirds, hundreds of Pelicans, some Killdear, some Eared Grebe’s, some American Avocets, hundreds of Gulls, some White-Faced Ibis, some Black-Faced Ibis, some American Coot’s, Lesser Yellow-Legs, hundreds of Canadian Geese, and some Forster’s Tern’s.

2020-06-11 Frank Lake 032020-06-11 Frank Lake 052020-06-11 Frank Lake 102020-06-11 Frank Lake 112020-06-11 Frank Lake 132020-06-11 Frank Lake 162020-06-11 Frank Lake 192020-06-11 Frank Lake 212020-06-11 Frank Lake 232020-06-11 Frank Lake 242020-06-11 Frank Lake 252020-06-11 Frank Lake 262020-06-14 Frank Lake 132020-06-11 Frank Lake 272020-06-14 Frank Lake 012020-06-14 Frank Lake 042020-06-14 Frank Lake 052020-06-14 Frank Lake 082020-06-14 Frank Lake 092020-06-14 Frank Lake 14

Also, I’m extremely proud to announce that I’ve been featured as one of Calgary’s best photographers of 2020 by The Best Calgary.

If you like the content that I produce and want to donate money towards the upkeep of my site, my travel, or buy me a cup of coffee please feel free to contribute towards it. I really appreciate it.

Donate By Clicking Here

Revisiting Peru

In 2014 I had the wonderful opportunity to visit the beautiful country of Peru with my father. I have quite a few friends visiting Peru in 2019/2020 so I figured I’d write a blog post describing my travels from what I can remember. I’ll explain via Q&A format as that’s probably the most palatable format for most people.

Do I Need a VISA?

If you’re visiting from Canada or the USA then you do not require a VISA.

How Long Should I Go For?

I recommend 10-14 days for a first time visit. We went for 10 days and it felt like the right amount of time, although some people may find that rushed. My father and I are go-go-go people so 10 days felt perfect.

What Vaccinations Should I Get?

There are no mandatory vaccines required for entry into Peru, but its recommended that you get Hepatitis A & B, and Yellow Fever (depending on the area of travel). I only had Hepatitis A & B when I travelled. I also recommend you bring Dukoral because I was the unfortunate victim to “muddy butt” (self explanatory) on the last day of my travels because we ate at a local restaurant that had food that came in contact with contaminated water. Let’s just say I had a very unpleasant week after that…

How Do You Get To Peru From Calgary?

The easiest way to get to Lima, Peru from Calgary is one of two ways:

  • Calgary to Lima via Houston on United Airlines. Typical costs range around $1000-1200 for economy class.
  • Calgary to Lima via Dallas on American Airlines. This is the route choice that we chose. Typical costs range around $1000-1200 for economy class but business class tickets can be had for as little as $1200 in our case if you hunt around. South America is an anomaly for cheap business class tickets for some reason; sometimes business class tickets can be had for the same price, if not cheaper due to lack of demand. Remember the more open seats the cheaper the airfare is; once seats fill up the prices usually start to increase.

Once you get to Lima you’re more than likely going to want to head to Cuzco, which is operated by LATAM. LATAM is a Chilean holding company that operates the largest airline and subsidiaries in South America. LATAM operates in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Peru.

What Is The Weather Like?

In general Peru is pretty mild year round. I found Lima to be muggy in mid June despite it’s mild low to mid 20°C temperatures. Cusco and the Sacred Valley (including Machu Picchu) I found to be t-shirt weather during the day, and sweater weather at night. In fact some evenings in the Sacred Valley approached near 0°C at night!

What Should You Visit In Peru?

First time visitors will definitely want to head to the following locations (all followed with pictures)

  • Cusco
    • Cusco is a city in southeastern peru, near the Urubamba Valley of the Andes mountain range. The city has a population of just under 500,000 people and is located at an elevation of 11200 feet (3400 metres). I highly recommend bringing some altitude sickness pills if you suffer from altitude sickness. I don’t usually get hypoxia or altitude sickness so I did not require these pills. Cusco was the historic capitcal of the Incan Empire from the 13th to 16th century Spanish conquest. Cusco was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983, and it definitely is deserving of this heritage title as there are manly beautiful architecturally significant sites around the city. I highly recommend exploring the local markets.

Ian GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan Griffin

  • Machu Picchu
    • Machu Picchu is an Incan citadel set high in the Andes Mountains in Peru, above the Urubamba River valley. This is the main attraction in Peru. Machu Picchu was built in the 15th century and later abandoned. It’s renowned for its sophisticated dry-stone walls that fuse huge blocks without the use of mortar, intriguing buildings that play on astronomical alignments and panoramic views.
    • To get to Machu Picchu we took the “Sacred Valley” PeruRail train from Urubamba to the base of Machu Picchu, where we boarded a tour coach to take us to the top of Machu Picchu.
    • When at the base of Machu Picchu I highly recommend exploring the base city as its filled with amazing markets, affordable accommodation and great food.

Ian GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan Griffin

  • Urubamba
    • Urubamba is the largest town in the Sacred Valley region of southeastern Peru. It is a busy transportation hub and sits on the Urubamba River, surrounded by rugged mountains. There is a popular market selling fresh fruit and vegetables and also pots, pans, and other essential items. The market does not really cater to tourists, but we chose to explore it anyways. We aware of people wanting money for taking photographs. I managed to get a picture of a badass Llama wearing sunshades!

Ian Griffin

  • Sacsayhuaman (pronounced Sexy Woman… I’m not kidding)
    • Sacsayhuaman is a citadel on the northern outskirts of the city of Cusco, Peru, the historic capital of the Inca Empire.

Ian GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan Griffin

  • Maras
    • Maras is a town near the city of Cusco in the Sacred Valley of southeastern Peru. It’s known for the Maras Salt Mines, thousands of individual salt pools on a hillside, dating back to Incan times. West of the town is Moray, an Inca archaeological site on a high plateau featuring a series of concentric terraces.

Ian GriffinIan GriffinIan GriffinIan Griffin

If you like the content that I produce and want to donate money towards the upkeep of my site, my travel, or buy me a cup of coffee please feel free to contribute towards it. I really appreciate it.

Donate By Clicking Here