Lake O’Hara Hike

A few weeks ago I had the privilege of exploring one of Canada’s most amazing places to visit; Lake O’Hara in Yoho National Park. Lake O’Hara is a protected area because its a sensitive alpine environment, so the Canadian government has a reservation system to limit the amount of people visiting. Less than 50 people per day are eligible to visit this park between mid-June and early October. I’ve been bidding on this reservation system for over 5 years, and was very surprised to wake up one morning to an email notifying me that I was successful. My successful day was June 20th, which was a work day, so I took the day off of work.

I drove out on the night of June 19th and stayed at Deer Lodge hotel in Lake Louise. I arrived around 8pm at night, checked in, and spent some time in the hot-tub while looking at the beautiful sunset. The sky was quite red due to forest fires in the area. I met a gentleman visiting from Montreal with his daughter, so we chatted for a while.

The next morning I woke up around 630am, packed up, dropped off the key, and drove down to the small stripmall at the bottom of the hill at Lake Louise. For breakfast I purchased a wrap and a coffee from Trailhead Cafe. After eating my breakfast I drove about 15 minutes to the trailhead for the Lake O’Hara bus and waited until it was time to board the bus at 815am. Just an FYI if you are not successful on the reservation system to get to Lake O’Hara you can walk the 11km (one-way) road up to the top, but it will add 6 hours to your day (3 hours each way). You’ll likely be too tired to complete many of the hikes available to you at the top.

The bus ride to the top took about 15-20 minutes. Upon arrival you’re able to get water at the nearby campsite, buy food from the store, and use the restroom facilities before starting your hiking adventures. Today I chose to complete the premier hike called the Lake O’Hara Alpine Circuit, which is one of the more difficult hikes, however it gives you a taste of everything that the area has to offer. All of my photos on this trip were taken with my iPhone 12 Pro Max, because sadly my Tamron 15-30mm lens for my Canon EOS R decided to stop working. I later found out that it was because the screws for the front element had become loose, which I was able to fix on a later day. I still think the photos turned out fairly nicely all things considered.

The 10.6km hike starts off at Lake O’Hara. You start walking clock-wise around the lake about 1/4 of the way before proceeding up some grueling switchbacks, gaining nearly 900 metres in only a few kilometers. On the way up the view of Lake O’Hara continues to get better and better!

At the top of the switchbacks you arrive at Wiwaxy Gap, where you can see Wiwaxy Peaks, Mount Huber, Lake O’Hara, the valley on the other side, and even Lake Oesa, which is where you head to next.

To get to Lake Oesa you continue along a narrow ledge losing a few hundred metres of altitude gradually, but it’s not too scary. There’s also some beautiful alpine flowers I saw along the way.

Lake Oesa was a stunning turquoise blue and was surrounded completely by mountains. From here some people choose to hike to Abbot Pass Hut, however I was limited on time, so perhaps another day.

Departing Lake Oesa you’re presented with a beautiful waterfall, and bunch of smaller, yet still beautiful lakes (Lefroy Lake, Victoria Lake, and Yukness Lake). The journey from here is slightly upwards over somewhat loose shale, so be careful.

After passing Lefroy Lake it starts to become a bit more technical with some slight scrambling, before levelling off again, presenting you with yet another beautiful view of Lake O’Hara.

After the scrambling section you follow along the cliff edge before descending towards a group of lakes; Moor Lakes and Hungabee Lake.

The general area around Hungabee Lake and Moor Lakes is another alpine meadow area, with water runoff going every direction. This is some of the most vivid coloured water that I’ve ever seen in my entire life!

The rest of the hike gives other nice perspectives of Lake O’Hara, however can be skipped if you’re feeling tired. You can skip it by taking the West Opabin Trail back to Lake O’Hara instead of continuing along the route and gaining another couple hundred metres on loose shale. This was one of the most spectacular hikes that I’ve completed in my entire life, and it was an absolute privilege to see this protected area. Buses back to the parking lot run at 230pm, 430pm, and 630pm. I was able to grab the 230pm bus back to the parking lot.

Be sure to check back soon as I explore more hikes; Carnavon Lake, and Crypt Lake. I also have an upcoming trip to Iceland, which I’m really looking forward to sharing with you.

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Stanley Glacier Hike

Since Monday was a holiday and the weather was nice I decided to take on the Stanley Glacier Hike, a 10.9km hike with 606 metres of elevation gain located near Lake Louise. When I arrived at the trailhead at 7:00am there was still a moderate amount of rain, despite the weather report stating there shouldn’t be any rain. I was considering turning back and calling it a day, but I sat in my car for about twenty minutes and the rain let up.

I started hiking at 7:20am and the hike starts out as a gentle gradual climb up through a new forested area (the area had burned down from a fire numerous years ago and there were some smaller trees). After emerging from the forest into the meadow you could start to see Stanley Glacier and a large waterfall from a distance. The meadow area was quite flat and super pretty.

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The last bit of the bike towards the glacier is quite the grunt, and is an unmaintained part of the trail, but there’s enough traffic during the summer months its quite apparent where the trail is. While I couldn’t directly walk to Stanley Glacier I did get fairly close however. I planted myself down on a big rock and ate lunch (homemade pizza from the night before), before venturing back to my car. On the way back I actually got to hike through the clouds, which was super cool and mysterious feeling. The hike took me just over 3 hours to complete.

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Parker Ridge & Edith Cavell Hikes

Last Monday I took the day off of work to drive through Jasper National Park to do some hiking and take in the sights. I decided the previous day on two hikes; Parker Ridge and Edith Cavell.

My first hike was Parker Ridge. Along the way I stopped at Herbert Lake and Bow Lake to take some photos.

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Parker Ridge is an easy to moderate hike that took me only 1.25 hours return to complete. The hike is 5.1km with 269m of elevation gain hike. The hike starts with a quick jaunt through some trees, before emerging to a series of switchbacks, before transitioning to a beautiful meadow. The rest of the hike is a quick 5-10 minutes of walking in the meadows before being rewarded with the pristine views of the Saskatchewan Glacier. I took a bunch of photos of the spectacular view before heading back to the car.

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It was then time to drive to Jasper for some lunch and a few beers before heading to my next hike; Edith Cavell. I settled on Jasper Brewing Company and had a delicious Ramen and a few India Pale Ale’s.

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After lunch it was about a 40 minute drive up a very windy road to the Edith Cavell trailhead. The hike is a moderate hike that took me about 2.25 hours return to complete. The hike is 6.1km with 409m of elevation gain. The hike starts with a slight incline to a view of the beautiful crystal clear blue lake, before heading up some strenuous switchbacks to the lookout points of the lake from above.

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