Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary 2020

Last weekend Julie, my Mom, and I visited the Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary. It was the second time that my mom and I have visited, and this time we brought along Julie. Mom and I last visited in 2018; you can view my post here.

Both of them thoroughly enjoyed visited the sanctuary. There were a few changes this times due to COVID-19; people had to sanitize their hands before entering the complex, and they also had to have their parties separated by 2 metres, which actually made for a better experience in my opinion.

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Their wolfhound pup named Finn, who was born in 2018, was all grown up now. It’s amazing to see how big he grew!

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Scott was our tour guide this time. First he took us to the Yamnuska Pack (high wolf content except Nikki), which included Kuna (3/4 White and Grey), Zeus (Black and Grey), Nova (Full White), and Nikki (white, grey, brown).

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Afterwards we were taken to the low content Cascade Pack, which included Rue, Loki, and Rocky.

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After the tour we explored the Rundle Pack (Nakita & Lark), Castle Pack (Kasha, Horton), Grotto Pack (Ruby & Enzo), Temple Pack (TK & Kaida), Norquay Pack (Kiba & Shadow), Galatea Pack (Freya & Odin), as well as their goats, and husky mascot.

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Abandoned Turney Valley Gas Plant

As most of you know COVID-19 has making its rounds around the globe, infecting over 525,000 people so far and taking the lives of 24,000 people as of the writing of this article on March 26th 2020. In Canada COVID-19 has infected 4000 people and taken the lives of 40 people. We’re not yet under mandatory lockdown, but we’re required to maintain social distancing. This didn’t stop me from taking a small drive to Turner Valley to fly my drone over the abandoned Turney Valley Gas Plant, which was built in 1914. At its peak, the Turner Valley Gas Plant was the largest gas processing facility in Canada.

In 1911 a man named William Herron collected a gas sample from the bubbling banks of Sheep Creek and sent it off for analysis. He then purchased Micael Stoss’ farm on the banks of the creek where the Turner Valley Gas Plant currently sits. On May 14th 1914 wet natural gas sprayed out of a well at “Dingman Number 1” and forever changed Alberta’s economy with the rise of the oil and gas industry.

The Turner Valley Gas Plant was established to process the oil and gas found in the Turner Valley area. It was the birthplace of western Canada’s petrochemical industry and underwent multiple changes over the decades.

Early production used a simple knock out system to remove water from the naphtha. The Calgary Petroleum Products company purchased the facility and built a small compressor and absorption plant, which later burned to the ground in 1920.

In 1921 the Royalite Oil Company built a new compressor station, a gasoline absorption plant, and a pipeline to Okotoks. In 1924 new separators were installed to recover gasoline before and after the absorption state, and new scrubbers to remove hydrogen sulfide, making it the first propane plant in Canada, and the second Sulphur plant in Canada.

The 1925 Seaboard-Kopper soda-ash scrubbing plant operated until 1952. The only surviving building from 1921 is the structure that housed the gasoline absorption plant. At it’s peak in 1942, the Turner Valley oilfield produced almost 10 million barrels of oil per year. It’s Horton Spheres were built in 1942, which made aviation fuel during World War 2. The Turner Valley Gas Plant operated until 1985, when it was decommissioned.

In 1988, Western Decalta Petroleum handed over the decommissioned facility to the Province of Alberta. It underwent $20 million in rehabilitation and cleanup before being opened as a preserved historic site to the public in 1995.

Turner Valley Historic

The historic image is not my own, and is subject to copyright of the original owner.

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Wash your hands religiously, maintain social distancing to flatten the curve, and stay safe. See you soon!

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