C-Level Cirque, Wapta Falls, Takakkaw Falls, Emerald Lake, and Natural Bridge

On August 18th I went and explored Yoho National Park in British Columbia, and completed C-Level Cirque in Banff National Park.

I started the day early and left my place at 7:00am with a quick stop get to some coffee from McDonald’s. First stop was Natural Bridge, which was once a waterfall, but the softer rock that was below the hard limestone had eroded away until the rock widened enough for the water to flow under the outcrop, thus creating a natural bridge.

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A quick drive down the road had me emerging at Emerald Lake. It was full of tourists so I didn’t stay very long. Despite being full of tourists it was still a beautiful sight to see.

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The next stop was Wapta Falls, which you can get to from a quick 4.7km rountrip hike that has 126 metres of elevation gain. It took me about 1 hour round trip to complete. Wapta Falls is a waterfall of the Kicking Horse River, and is about 30 metres high and 150 metres wide. The waterfall averages 254 cubic metres of second of water flow.

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The next stop was Takakkaw Falls, which you can get to from an even quicker 1.4km rountrip walk (yes lets not even call it a hike), with only 36 metres of elevation gain. Takakkaw Falls stands at an impressive height of 373 metres tall, making it the second tallest waterfall in Canada. Takakkaw, a Cree word, translated to the word “wonderful” in English. The falls are fed by meltwater from the Daly Glacier, which is part of the Waputik Icefield.

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The last and final stop was the C-Level Cirque hike in Banff National Park, about a 45 minute drive away. The hike is quite the huff at 9.2km with 755 metres of elevation gain. The hike mostly has you in the trees until you are greeted with an amazing view of Lake Minnewanka. At the beginning of the trail there is some old abandoned coal mine buildings and shafts. I was warned about a bear towards the end of the trail head but that didn’t deter me. I had my bear spray with me.

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Canadian Classic Tour – Grizzly Bears

A while back I had the amazing opportunity to go on a trip of a lifetime with my mom to Khutzeymateen, British Columbia. The tour is operated by Classic Canadian Tours (http://www.classiccanadiantours.com/). The tour involves taking a private chartered Boeing 737-300 on Canadian North to Prince Rupert where we boarded a beautiful 72 person catamaran and cruised up the inside passage into the Khutzeymateen grizzly sanctuary. Renowned Canadian Brian Keating was on the trip as one of the tour guides. We saw 28 grizzlies on this day, a new record according to Brian. We also saw some whales, and many different species of brids. The day was long, having woke up at 4am and returning at around 7pm, but was so worth it. Here’s a glimpse of some of my favorite photos.

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May 14th 2016 – Paint Pots Hike

Today I went on a beautiful, but short hike in British Columbia. It is a one kilometer hike, but is one of the most unique sceneries I’ve seen in my life. The Indian’s used to travel here to obtain the “red earth”. The yellow ochre was cleaning, kneaded with water into walnut-sized balls and flattened into cakes. The cakes were then baked in a fire, then ground into a powder. The red powder was then mixed with fish oil or animal grease and used in painting bodies, teepees, clothing, and pictures on rocks.

The paint pots resulted from the accumulation of iron oxide or hydroxide around the rim of a pool. As the rim grew, the pool got deeper. The increased pressure of water in the pool became greater than the force of the water in the spring, causing the spring to seek a new outlet. When this happened, the pot eventually dried up, forming a choked cone.

Mining of iron oxide was attempted in the 1920’s, but was not considered viable due to economic and ecological reasons.

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