Kelowna – Part 2 of 3

Last week Julie and I embarked on a week long holiday to Kelowna for some relaxation, lots of food, wine tours, cider tastings, and to visit my friend Krystylyn. We left on Saturday September 5th and went home on Saturday September 12th. Let’s continue with this series.

Tuesday September 8th 2020

Tuesday was our wine tour day with Uncorked. We were picked up at 9:00am by our lovely driver Herb. Herb has been with the company for 11 years now, and spent the majority of his working life as an RCMP Crime Scene Investigator. He worked on many high profile cases.

First stop on our tour was Summer Hill Pyramid Winery, a classic favourite of Julie and I’s. We ended up purchasing a few bottles of wine here. This is my third time coming here. I even attended a wedding here in 2014. The winery was established in 1986 by the Cipes family, and is the most visited winery in British Columbia. A unique feature of the winery is the pyramid cellar that ages the wine. The pyramid was built in 1997 and is an 8% replica of the Great Pyramid in Egypt. Rumour has it numerous taste comparisons of the same wine, bottled on the same day, and served at the same temperature (some in the pyramid, some outside) resulted in the majority preferring the wine aged in the cellar.

Second stop on our tour was Nagging Doubt, a small artisanal winery owned and operated by Rob Westbury. His small winery was a very pleasant surprise and he had some of the nicest wine I have ever tasted in Kelowna. We ended up purchasing a bottle of their 2015 “The Pull”, and a 2016 “The Leap”, but strong red wines.

Third stop was Priest Creek Family Estate Winery, Kelowna’s newest winery, that just opened up a few weeks ago. It is quite remarkable that they opened during the middle of a pandemic, but they are doing quite well, and sold out of many of their wines already. They used some creative marketing techniques such as social media, flyers, pamphlets, etc. to get their name out there. The vineyard was purchased by Darren and Jane Sawin in 2015. Originally they sold their grapes to BC Fruit, but realized that wasn’t going to pay the bills. With some consultation of some friends they decided to start their own winery on their vineyard and bottle their own grapes. The wines here are super light and delicate, but are delicious.

It was then time for lunch. We ended up stopping at McCulloch Station Pub, where I had a delicious Ruben sandwich, deep fried pickles and beer.

The fourth stop was Vibrant Vines. The winery was established in 2010 by Wyn Lewis. You’re handed a pair of 3D glasses when you start your tour and can enjoy all the beautiful 3D artwork throughout the building, and on the bottles of wine. While we enjoyed the beautiful artwork, we can’t say we enjoyed the wine very much. We ended up skipping wine purchases here.

The fifth stop was Tantalus, which is both a favourite of ours. Tantalus was established in 2004 by Eric Savics. Eric purchased the vineyard from Pioneer Vineyards, who planted the first grapes in 1927 when it was under the reins of local horticulturist JW Hughes. The old vine plantings; 1978 Riesling and 1985 Pinot Noir & Chardonnay’s became the backbone of the vineyard. The other grapes were removed and three new types of grapes were planted in 2005.

After the wine tour Herb allowed up to stop at the liquor store so I could pick up some IPA beers, before dropping us off back at our condo. The rest of the evening was spent playing board games, reading, and down by the dock.

Wednesday September 9th 2020

Wednesday morning we spent relaxing by the beach. I read some of my book called “Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff”, which I loaned from Julie. It’s a really informative book that puts things into perspective.

In the afternoon Julie and I visited Wards Cidery and Vineyard, and Kitsch Wines quickly before meeting up with Krystylyn for dinner. At Wards we ended up purchasing a few bottles and cans of cider from Wards, including my personal favourite which was hibiscus tea infused cider.

Wards Cidery has been around since 1922 and is in it’s 5th generation of family ownership. Within the last 10 years they also started dabbling in wines, but I honestly didn’t like their wines. We ended up purchasing some Hibiscus infused Cider, and two other types of hard cider from them.

Kitsch Wines is owned by founders Ria and Trent Kitsch, who also launched SAXX Underwear in 2006. The couple planted a vineyard in 2010. The family roots actually stems back to 1910, when Kelowna was still in its infancy, four generations ago. We liked some of the wines there and ended up purchasing a 2016 Pinot Noir.

After visiting Wards & Kitsch we met up with Krystylyn at her condo and walked over to this hole in the wall restaurant called Mad Mango for some Malaysian Laksa. This was my first time having Laksa, as well as Julie, and we both agreed that it was fantastic. We will definitely be trying to make Laksa in the coming weeks, as we are big foodies.

After having dinner we walked back to Krystylyn’s condo and said bye for the evening. We will meet her again, one more time on the last day before we head home.

We quickly stopped by Red Bird Brewery for a six-pack of IPA for myself and then head back to the condo. In the evening we hung out by the dock and played some more Catan. Honestly Julie has been kicking my butt this week at Catan, and I can’t catch a break. While at the dock we meet another wonderful couple named Evan and Kayla and ended up chatting for about and hour.

Be sure to check back soon for part 3 of 3 in my Kelowna series.

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Kelowna – Part 1 of 3

Last week Julie and I embarked on a week long holiday to Kelowna for some relaxation, lots of food, wine tours, cider tastings, and to visit my friend Krystylyn. We left on Saturday September 5th and went home on Saturday September 12th.

Saturday September 5th 2020

Saturday was our travel day to Kelowna. We set off towards Kelowna at around 8:00am. On our way we had a quick stop for lunch at Subway in Golden. Continuing on, we also stopped at Dutchmen Dairy to get some delicious ice cream and to see their baby cows. Julie & I both had lemon sherbet flavour, and agreed that it was the best ice cream that we have ever eaten. The baby cows were extremely cute to see as well!

After our stop at Dutchmen Dairy we walked across the street to the farmers market where we picked up some fresh fruit and vegetables. After picking up vegetables we drove to Grass Root Dairies for some delicious gouda cheese. This is the first time in six years since I’ve been to the dairy farm. The 37 year old farm was purchased from the Gort Family 11 years ago by the Wikkerinks Family. The name was recently changed from Gort’s Gouda Farm to Grass Root Dairies. I’ve been coming here every time I drive through the area since I was 16 years old.

After 9 hours of driving, and poor directions from our AirBnb host we finally found our condo building, which was located at Lake Okanogan Resort, about a 20 minute drive outside of Kelowna on West Side Road. We spent nearly 30 minutes looking for the building with the host’s poor directions, but if he had just stated to put Lake Okanogan Resort into Google Maps it would have solved a lot of the problem.

Our well furnished condo was located on the 7th floor of the “Terrace 3” building… well technically it’s the sixth floor according to the elevator, as the elevator starts on floor 2, which it considers as the main floor. The condo was lacking a few amenities which we believe should be standard in every rental, including shampoo, soap, toilet paper, and dish washing tablets for the dishwasher. We ended up having to purchase our own when we went grocery shopping the next day.

After settling into our condo and unpacking we drove into Kelowna to have some delicious dinner at El Taquero. Julie and I ordered some mini tacos and some drinks. I had a Mezcal Sour, and Julie had a Blood Orange Gin.

After eating dinner we went to BNA Brewing for a drink and to fill my beer growler. Julie had a delicious can of SOMA dry cider. I had “Big Mario” IPA as well as filled my growler with the same.

After having a drink we walked around the Marina before heading back to our condo for the evening. During our walk I saw a beautiful floatplane docked next to a nice boat.

Sunday September 6th 2020

Sunday was a supposed to be a lazy start to the day, but we were both awake by 8:00am. We had breakfast at the condo with the fruit and veggies that we had purchased yesterday.

First stop of the day was the Kangaroo Creek Farm, which recently moved next to the airport. The hobby farm has been around for 9 years now and is a wonderful place to visit with anyone, including children. The farm has all sorts of animals including kangaroos, birds, goats, turkeys, sugar gliders, ducks, and porcupines. Entrance fee’s are very reasonable; $12 for adults, $6 for children and seniors, and free for children under 4 years old.

On our way driving to the Kangaroo Creek Farm we saw a cidery next door called Upside Cider. We decided to stop there for a flight of ciders and some lunch. We shared a gluten-free fire cooked Chorizo and Salami pizza, which was delicious.

After lunch we drove to Gray Monk winery for a wine tasting. They had delicious wines and we ended up buying a bottle of Meritage. I was specifically looking for a particular Gammy Noir wine, which apparently they stop making in 2013, but they recommended that we try Intrigue winery, which was just up the road. Gray Monk was founded in 1972 by the Heiss Family, and is one of my favourite winerys. When Gray Monk was first started, they began as an Estate Winery due to regulations at the time. Rules have changed since then, as there is now a simplified distinction between a land-based (farm style) winery, and a commercial winery, but Gray Monk choose to keep the Estate Winery status because of its history and importance.

Located just up the road from Gray Monk is Intrigue Wines. The vineyard was established in 2008 by the Davis & Wong families. Roger Wong originally worked over at Gray Monk before starting Intrigue Wines. I personally didn’t like their wines, and didn’t purchase anything from them.

Ancient Hill Winery was the next stop. Julie and I quite liked the wines here and I ended up purchasing a Baco Noir, and Julie ended up purchasing a Gewurztraminer. Ancient Hill was founded in 2009 by Richard and Jitske Kamphuys.

We then tried to go to Arlo Bee Farm, which we both thought was a disappointment. We thought it would have been a lot more informative, but it really lacked information. We were told that their honey is quite nice, and it is featured at Tantalus Winery, among other places.

Next stop was Okanogan Wine and Spirits, where Darren showcased a variety of Whisky, Gin and Liqueurs to Julie and I. Darren was absolutely hilarious and is very knowledgeable on all the products. I ended up purchasing a Huckleberry Liqueur, which I mix with sparkling water. The distillery was founded in 2004 and utilizes 100% locally grown fruits and grains.

Next up was dinner, which we had at a wonderful restaurant called KRAFTY Kitchen + Bar. Due to COVID-19 they had an interesting way of ordering; you just text them your order and they will respond to let you know they received it, and then a short while later bring it out. I had the Truffled Mac N’ Cheese, which was amazing. Julie had the Saffron Tomato Risotto, which was also delicious.

The final stop for the day was Superstore to pickup some groceries for the week. When we arrived back at the condo we relaxed down by the beach and played some Catan, which is our favourite game.

Monday September 7th 2020

Monday was our day with my friend Krystylyn. We met her at her apartment at 8:00am and drove to the Myra Canyon Trestles for a bicycle ride. Krystylyn brough her bicycle with her on the back of her, and Julie and I rented a bicycle from the rental guys at the top for $39 each.

The Myra Canyon Trestles are a popular area for people to hike and ride along just 30 minutes outside of Kelowna. The history of the trestles stems back to 1915 when the Kettle Valley Railway (subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR)) was incorporated. The railway was operated between 1915 and was partially abandoned in 1961, with the last train operating in 1989.

The railways was built for servicing the growing mining demands of the British Columbia Southern Interior. When the original CPR main transcontinental railway was completed in 1885 it had to be routed through the Rocky Mountains at Kicking Horse and Rogers Pass, which left a significant amount of mining towns un-serviced by the main railway. It was decided to build the Kettle River Railway to service the area, at an astonishing cost of $20 million, which was the highest cost per mile of any railway built at the time. The Railway was built in several sections between Kamloops and Midway, with some offshoots heading to Copper Mountain and Osoyoos. The project took nearly 20 years to complete. The most difficult portion of the railway is between Myra Station and June Springs Station; which required 18 wooden trestles and two tunnels.

After the railway was abandoned in 1989 the area quickly became popular with hikers and cyclists, due to its gentle grade. The bridges fell into disarray due to vandals and after petitioning from locals the government designated that section into a National Historic Site in 2002.

In September 2003 the Okanagan Mountain Park Fire ripped through the area and engolfed 12 of the 18 trestles. In addition, the bridge decks of two metal bridges were also destroyed. The bridges were eventually rebuilt by the British Columbia provincial government. Our ride took about 2 hours and was quite chilly since the sky was overcast, and we were higher up in the hills.

After returning our bikes and driving down the hill we went to Smokes Poutinerie for lunch. The menu was fairly limited compared to pre-COVID times, but it was still pretty good. I had a triple pork poutine.

After lunch we walked over to Rustic Reel Brewing and had some beverages. I had two pints of their Hazy IPA. Julie had Sajiva Kombucha, and Krystylyn had an assorted flight of beers.

After lunch we said bye to Krystylyn and drove back to our condo, where we spent the rest of the day relaxing, playing games, and down by the beach.

Be sure to check back soon for part 2 of 3 in my Kelowna series.

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Czech Republic – Pilsner Urquell Brewery Tour

After visiting Český Krumlov it was time to head to Pilsen for a tour of the Pilsner Urquell Brewery in the city of Pilsen. Before we take a look at the brewery lets take a look at the beautiful city of Pilsen.

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The brewery was founded in 1839 by local Czech and German speaking citizens in the city and for the first two years was brewed in the homes of the locals. There was major inconsistencies in the beer so it was decided to build the Burgess Brewery in 1842, which is where the current brewery stands today. Currently the brewery produces almost 10 million hectoliters of beer per year. It was the first brewery in the world to produce pale lager, branded as Pilsner Urquell since 1898, which can be roughly translated from Czech to English as “the original source at Pilsen”. The beer was trademarked in 1898. The brewery was sold to the Japanese company Asahi in March 2017.

During the tour they took us to the original water tower, the bottling factory, the old brewery, the new brewery, and the original underground cellar network. We even were able to sample some of the original unfiltered and unpasteurized beer that is still brewed and stored in kegs in the underground cellar. The flavor profile is quite distinct compared to the regular filtered version.

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Portland – Day 1 – Travel Day & Portland By Night

This weekend I had the wonderful opportunity to visit the beautiful city of Portland, Oregon. Before we dive into what I did lets take a brief look at the history of Portland to understand how it came to be where it is today.

Portland is Oregon’s largest and most populated city with a population of roughly 650,000 people. Portland was founder in the 1830’s by pioneers who travelled via the Oregon Trail. The Oregon Trail is a 2170 mile (3490 km) East-West wagon route that was used by pioneers and fur traders in the early to mid 1800’s. Portland was originally referred to as Stumptown and The Clearing because of the many trees that had to be cut down to allow for the growth of the settlement. In 1843 William Overton saw potential in the new settlement but lacked the funds to file an official land claim, so for a mere 25 cents he agreed to share half of the site with Asa Lovejoy from Boston. In 1845 Overton sold the remaining half to Francis Pettygrove from Portland, Maine. Both Pettygrove and Lovejoy wanted to rename The Clearing after their hometowns, and the renaming was settled with a coin toss. Pettygrove won in a series of two out of three coin tosses, and The Clearing was renamed Portland after Pettygrove’s hometown of Portland, Maine. The coin used to make the decision was declared the Portland Penny and is on display in the Oregon Historical Society headquarters.

Portland was officially incorporated on February 8 1851 and had a population of 800 people. There was a major fire in 1873 which wiped out about 20 city blocks. The city rebuilt and by 1890 the city had a population of 46000 people. Portland’s access to water made it a major port city for the timber industry and helped provide a major boom to the city’s early economy. This also helped earn the city the unfortunate reputation as being a dangerous city with organized crime and racketeering. It took a while to shake this rough edge but Portland came out of the 1960’s with a new lease on life with its progressive political and environmental views. The city operates with a commission-based government guided led by a major as well as four commissioners and a directly elected metropolitan planning organization. The city is recognized internationally as one of the world’s most environmentally conscious cities due to its ease of walkability, large number of public parks, large use of bicycles, public transportation, and inner-city farming. An interesting fact is that this city is also ideal for growing roses and Portland has also been called the City of Roses. Portland also has various other nicknames such as Bridgetown, Beervana, and Brewtopia.

I started out my Portland trip by arriving at Portland International Airport (PDX) on an Air Canada Express Bombardier Q400. The flight was a direct flight from YYC to PDX and took roughly 2 hours. PDX has an iconic carpet that features geometric shapes on a teal background representing what the birds eye view of the airport as seen by the air traffic controllers from the airport tower. The original carpet was installed in 1987 and received a ton of media attention and was loved by travelers and locals. In 2013 the Port of Portland announced the replacement of the carpet and this caused quite the stir on social media. The original carpet removal began in January 2015, with the airport recycling the extremely worn out portions and the remaining pieces were sold to local retail vendors. The new carpet design places more of an emphasis on modern design and features natural and man-shape shapes found around the airport, including references to flight, nature and structures such as airplane wings, hiking trails, leaves, runways and waterways. Installation was completed in November 2015. The carpet replacement ended up costing roughly $13 million. Personally I’m a fan of the old design, compared to the new design.
The old carpet design has inspired designs in socks, tie’s, sneakers, underwear, etc. Portland Trail Blazers basketball team point guard Damian Lillard released two Adidas branded shoes with the design between 2015 and 2016.

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After arriving in Portland there are a few forms of transportation to get into the city center; the MAX Red Line LRT ($2.50 USD), Uber ($22/USD average), Taxi ($35/USD average), and Rental Car ($35/day USD average). In order to align with my frugal ways of travel I opted for the MAX Red Line LRT, which should have taken roughly 40 minutes to go from PDX to Pioneer Square North, which was close to the hotel I was staying at; Hotel Radisson RED. Unfortunately, after just a few stops the train stopped and the transit operator told us to take a cab, Uber, or bus since the train bridge was having trouble getting locked in the down position.

The MAX LRT system is comprised of 5 lines spanning over 60 miles (97 km) and has 97 stations. Construction of the MAX network started in 1982. The MAX system was conceived after a series of anti-freeway movements by locals in the 1970’s. The system utilizes 750 Volts DC overhead wires similar to Calgary’s very own LRT system, except ours utilize only 600 Volts DC. Rolling stock includes five different models; simply called Type 1 through Type 5. The original Type 1’s were a joint venture project with Canada’s Bombardier and La Brugeoise et Nivelles from Belgium. The Type 1’s were high floor type trains that did not allow wheelchair accessibility. After the passing of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990 the requirement for low floor type trains were a must, which lead to the Type 2 low floor trains that were developed by Siemens, dubbed SD660’s. Type 3’s were also SD660’s. Type 4’s were Siemens S70’s. Type 5’s were essentially improved S70’s. Trainsets are typically only 2 cars, and Type 1-3 are interchangeable and Type 4-5 are interchangeable.

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Anyways… back to the trip. We got an Uber ride from a guy named Dustin, who was super friendly. He was originally from Oklahoma and ended up coming here to study Business and Economics at Portland State University. He was doing some Uber driving on the side. After getting dropped off by Dustin we checked into our hotel. The Radisson RED Portland is a brand new hotel that just opened in November 2018. The hotel has 180 rooms on 8 floors, while the remaining floors in the tower are consumed by office space. The room was massive and very hip with all sorts of retro art murals. The room had a king size bed, work area, ample storage, and a luxurious bathroom with white tiles with red grout and a lobster mural in the shower! The hotel even has an arcade and games room on the second floor loft that overlooks the foyer area.

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After dropping off our bags we walked to Deschutes Brewery. On the way I took multiple photos of Portland at night. Deschutes Brewery is one of my favorite craft breweries. Deschutes Brewery was opened in 1988 with the main brewery located in Bend, Oregon. Deschutes Brewery also has a satellite pub in Portland’s Pearl District, which is the one we visited. The brewery produces a wide range of beers including Black Butte Porter, Mirror Pond Pale Ale, Fresh Squeezed IPA, Inversion IPA, Chainbreaker White IPA, Deschutes River Ale, Obsidian Stout, Red Chair NWPA, Twilight Summer Ale, Jubelale, Hop Henge Experimental IPA, Hop Trip, Chasin’ Freshies, The Dissident, Mirror Mirror, and The Abyss. Deschutes uses an in-house, proprietary yeast strain resembling Wyeast Laboratories, Inc. #1187 Ringwood Ale yeast. Deschutes is the eighth largest craft brewery and fifteenth largest brewery in the US, producing over 29.3 million litres of beer annually. It was time for me to drink a few of those litres of beer!

First up was Hazy IPA. Second up was Fresh Squeezed IPA. Third up was Inversion IPA. The Hazy IPA was my favorite of the three. Catherine ended up having a Cider and tried some of my Hazy IPA. She really liked the Hazy IPA, maybe I’m converting her… just maybe… We also decided to also have some food so we shared an IPA Pretzel served with gooey cheese and mustard. It was absolutely incredible.

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After becoming moderately drunk it was time to go back to the hotel as we had a big day ahead of us. Oh, did I mention we actually had to leave because the bar closed at… 10pm? Yes, that’s right it closes at 10pm on a Thursday.

Check back tomorrow when we explore the beautiful city of Portland during the day and go to a Darci Lynne show in the evening.

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August 29th 2016 – New Zealand Day 9

Today I woke up at 6:00am, without the help of an alarm. I guess I was done sleeping. I made myself breakfast and then started up my camper. It was a very cold morning today, at only 2 degrees Celsius. The camper sputtered to life, albeit a bit miserable. Even modern diesels are not the happiest at cold temperatures. I let the camper warm up a few minutes before taking off on my journey towards Napier.
The trip to Napier took about an hour and a half, covering approximately 130km. I was absolutely blown away by Napier. This was the highlight of my New Zealand trip so far! I love Art Deco architectural styling, and Napier happens to be the best preserved city on earth. In fact it is unofficially the Art Deco capital of the world! It was even nominated in 2007 to be a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but was denied due to it not meeting all the criteria. Also, Napier, is the twin sister city to Victoria, Canada, but I don’t quite see the resemblance.
Art Deco, also just known in short for Deco, is beautiful style that first appeared in France just before World War 1. It became very popular world wide in the 1920’s and 1930’s, seeing its influence in everything from architecture, cars, furniture, trains, and even ocean liners! Art Deco features geometric shapes, clear and precise lines, and decoration which is attached to the structure, but not part of the structural load bearing characteristics. Art Deco is often represented with luxury, and glamour, but its time came to an end at the brink of World War 2 because it was considered to ostentatious and fancy. World War 2 hit in full force and “Modern” style architecture took over. Art Deco and Mid Century Modern, the successor to “Modern” architecture are my two favorite architectural styles.
I walked around Napier for a few hours taking in all the Art Deco I could get my eyes on. I came across a pie shop and ordered a $4 chicken, cranberry, and cream cheese pie. It was the most delicious pie I’ve ever had in my life. The flavours just melt in your mouth, and one pie is quite filling.
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After my delightful visit in Napier it was time to move on to my next stop, Hastings, which was the twin and bigger sister to Napier. Hastings had a completely different feel to it. Napier had more industrial activity than Hastings, but it felt cuter and had a more cozy feel to it. Hastings had better examples of Art Deco in my opinion, but the city felt a bit cold and I was harassed by a bunch of homeless people, and hooligans hanging around a central park so that didn’t leave me with a good feeling about Hastings.
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After visiting Hastings I meandered my way along Highway 2 towards Wellington. I came across the main Tui brewery so I decided to stop and check it out. The brewery was closed due to being upgraded, but the bar area was still open. I tried a few samples, bought a growler of their brew master’s special, and toured their museum.
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I continued along my journey and found a really nice paid campsite with electricity for $10 in the town of Eketahuna. I setup my camper on a gravel pad in the middle of the huge camp ground next to an electrical pole. I stuck to the gravel because the ground was extremely saturated with water and I felt the weight of my camper would be too much that I would sink in. There were only three other campers besides me. I was hungry so I decided I would use my built-in BBQ to prepare some spaghetti and meat sauce, but the BBQ had some issues. The right burner nozzle was clogged, and the left burner was suffering from some performance issues. I brought the food inside and used the stove.
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The owner of the facility came down on his scooter at around 7:00pm to collect the $10 payment. We chatted for about ten minutes, before he went and collected payments from the other campers. The rest of the evening was spent working on my photo’s and my blog.
Tomorrow I’m heading towards Wellington. Check back tomorrow!
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