Abandoned Turney Valley Gas Plant

As most of you know COVID-19 has making its rounds around the globe, infecting over 525,000 people so far and taking the lives of 24,000 people as of the writing of this article on March 26th 2020. In Canada COVID-19 has infected 4000 people and taken the lives of 40 people. We’re not yet under mandatory lockdown, but we’re required to maintain social distancing. This didn’t stop me from taking a small drive to Turner Valley to fly my drone over the abandoned Turney Valley Gas Plant, which was built in 1914. At its peak, the Turner Valley Gas Plant was the largest gas processing facility in Canada.

In 1911 a man named William Herron collected a gas sample from the bubbling banks of Sheep Creek and sent it off for analysis. He then purchased Micael Stoss’ farm on the banks of the creek where the Turner Valley Gas Plant currently sits. On May 14th 1914 wet natural gas sprayed out of a well at “Dingman Number 1” and forever changed Alberta’s economy with the rise of the oil and gas industry.

The Turner Valley Gas Plant was established to process the oil and gas found in the Turner Valley area. It was the birthplace of western Canada’s petrochemical industry and underwent multiple changes over the decades.

Early production used a simple knock out system to remove water from the naphtha. The Calgary Petroleum Products company purchased the facility and built a small compressor and absorption plant, which later burned to the ground in 1920.

In 1921 the Royalite Oil Company built a new compressor station, a gasoline absorption plant, and a pipeline to Okotoks. In 1924 new separators were installed to recover gasoline before and after the absorption state, and new scrubbers to remove hydrogen sulfide, making it the first propane plant in Canada, and the second Sulphur plant in Canada.

The 1925 Seaboard-Kopper soda-ash scrubbing plant operated until 1952. The only surviving building from 1921 is the structure that housed the gasoline absorption plant. At it’s peak in 1942, the Turner Valley oilfield produced almost 10 million barrels of oil per year. It’s Horton Spheres were built in 1942, which made aviation fuel during World War 2. The Turner Valley Gas Plant operated until 1985, when it was decommissioned.

In 1988, Western Decalta Petroleum handed over the decommissioned facility to the Province of Alberta. It underwent $20 million in rehabilitation and cleanup before being opened as a preserved historic site to the public in 1995.

Turner Valley Historic

The historic image is not my own, and is subject to copyright of the original owner.

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Wash your hands religiously, maintain social distancing to flatten the curve, and stay safe. See you soon!

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USA – Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah – Part 2 of 2

In September 2017 my Dad and I went on a one week trip to the USA to explore the beautiful scenery that Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah have to offer. I started my blog series in 2016 but due to 2017 being such a busy year for travel I actually forgot to write about this.

2017 USA Road Trip

In Part 1 of 2 we left off with staying the night on Day 3 in Albuquerque after visiting the Puye Cliff Dwellings. This is Part 2 of 2 of this series. Enjoy!

On the 4th day we continued driving north towards the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge with a stop at the Classical Gas Museum in Embudo, New Mexico. The museum is the work of a man named Johnnie Meier, a gentleman who after retiring from the nearby Los Alamos National Laboratory started to collect car memorabilia. His collection is the efforts of over 25 years of hard work.

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After stopping at the Classical Gas Museum we continued north to the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge. The 390 metre (1280 foot) long steel deck arch bridge was designed by architect Charles Reed, and was built in 1965. It is the 10th highest bridge in the USA, sitting roughly 180 metres (600 feet) above the Rio Grande River. The bride won the award of being the “Most Beautiful Steel Bridge” in the “Long Span” category in 1966 by the American Institute of Steel Construction. In 1997 it was added to the 1997 National Register of Historic Place (NRHP). It received a relatively in-expensive $2.4 million repair and facelift in 2012, which included structural steelwork, a new concrete deck surface, new sidewalks, ramps, curbs and gutters. When we were there we also met a couple who were riding around on a completely custom V8 trike that they had built.

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After visiting the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge we continued along our journey to our next stop just a few minutes away called Earthship Biotecture. Michael Reynolds is the founder and creator of the concept. He came to Taos after graduation architectural school in 1969. He was inspired by the problem of trash, pollution and the lack of affordable housing so he sought out a solution to create affordable housing that was sustainable. These homes are called Earthships. His home designs can be seen all over North America, including close to home here in my province of Alberta. Dad and I purchased a few books and I ended up reading them along the road trip. They were extremely informative and you can easily create an Earthship, even for use in a colder climate such as Alberta, with a lot of elbow grease.

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After visiting Earthship Biotecture it was time to find some accommodation. We ended up heading back to Flagstaff, Arizona for the night. Accommodation was at the Couryard by Marriott for $120 CDN. We went back to Flagstaff Brewing Company for dinner and more beers.

The next day we woke up early and we drove to Shiprock, New Mexico before heading to the Four Corners Mounment. Shiprock, also known by the Navajo as “the rick with wings” is a monadnock rising 483 metres (1583 feet) above the desert. It’s peak is 2188 metres (7177 feet) above sea level.

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The Four Corners Monument marks the quadripoint in the US where the states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah meet. Is the only point in the United States where four states perfectly meet. The monument  is made of granite and brass and I got a picture of myself in all four states.

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Next stop was Natural Bridges National Monument where Dad and I did some hiking. We first hiked Sipapu Bridge, which is a 2 km hike with 133 metres (436 feet) of elevation differential. Across from the bridge you can actually see the ancient structures of Horse Collar Ruin that were believed to have been built over 700 years ago!

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The next hike in Natural Bridges National Monument was Kachina Bridge, a 2.25 km hike with 140 metres (462 feet) of elevation differential. There is a lot of switchbacks and wooden stairs to get to the bottom of the valley, but the view was totally worth it!

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The final stop in Natural Bridges National Monument was Owachomo Bridge, also known as the “Little Bridge” It’s extremely slender in the middle and is also the oldest bridge in the park. The hike is only 1 km and has 60 metres (190 feet) of elevation differential. This was my favourite bridge in the park!

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It was time to find somewhere to stay for the night. We ended up staying at the Super 8 in Moab for $80 CDN. We had dinner at The Blu Pig, a blue’s themed bar with delicious smoked meat. I felt my arteries clogging as I ate my food and we drank our beer.

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The next morning we had breakfast at the Moab Diner, before driving into Canyonlands to see the Indian Hieroglyph’s and the unique rock features in the park.

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The next stop, which was my favorite park of the entire trip was Arches National Park.  When you enter into the park you see the beautiful “Courthouse Towers”!

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Our two stops were the magnificent “North Window” and equally stunning “Double Arch”.

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Next up was Panorama Point and “Delicate Arch”. Delicate Arch required 5 km of hiking with 190 metres (620 feet) of elevation differential, but it was worth it!

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The final stop for the day was Goblin Valley State Park. “The Three Sisters” great you as you enter the park.

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We decided to do “The Goblin’s Lair” hike while we were in the park. The hike is 4 km long and has about 50 metres (165 feet) of elevation differential. At the end of the hike there is a cave area you can climb into, which I decided to do, but my dad stayed back in case I got injured as it was fairly difficult climbing down into the cave.

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It was time to check into our hotel for the night. We stayed at The Snuggle Inn in Loa, Utah for $120 CDN. We had the entire hotel to ourselves. Dinner was at the wonderful restaurant that I don’t remember the name of, but a quick look on google maps shows that it no longer exists.

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The next morning we had breakfast at The Country Café. the owner was very nice and it was funny because he was mad that his son was late showing up to work and when his son did show up to work he just took money from the till and left. The food was pretty good though!

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Today we drove towards Las Vegas with a few stops along the way including Zion National Park. It was absolutely pouring rain in Zion National Park so we just got out of the car to take a few photos, before continuing on to Las Vegas.

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After arriving in Las Vegas Dad and I checked into the Luxor Hotel for the next 2 nights. Rooms were only $40 CDN per night so we both got our own room. He was starting to not feel too well so he ended up having a nap and I explored the hotel and the Las Vegas streets.

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The next day Dad and I went for breakfast at a restaurant outside of Planet Hollywood, but that restaurant no longer exists, and I can’t find the name of it online.

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After breakfast we visited The Auto Collections car museum at the LINQ Hotel, formerly the Imperial Palace. Sadly, the museum shut down at the end of 2017. I’m very fortunate to have seen this museum 3 times since 2013.2017-09-01 USA 3882017-09-01 USA 3892017-09-01 USA 3922017-09-01 USA 3942017-09-01 USA 3972017-09-01 USA 4002017-09-01 USA 4102017-09-01 USA 4112017-09-01 USA 4122017-09-01 USA 418

We spent the afternoon relaxing at the hotel, and even did some gambling, making a 50% profit on the $20 we initially invested. Dad still wasn’t feeling well so I decided to go to the Neon Museum by myself in the evening. The Neon Museum features signs from old casinos and other businesses from the Las Vegas area. The main feature is the fully restored lobby shell from the defunct La Concha Motel as it’s main visitor center. The Neon Museum opened on October 27th 2012.

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One the final day of our trip we went to the Carroll Shelby Museum before doing some plane spotting, and then catching our flight home. The Carroll Shelby Museum, which functions three-fold as the Headquarters, a Museum, and the actual production facility.

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An all-time past of mine is plane spotting. I have an absolute love of aviation, and my father has always taken me plane spotting since I was a very small child. Las Vegas has some prime plane spotting areas, which my Dad had researched, so we sat and watching planes for a bit, before it was time to catch our flight home.

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Be sure to check back soon when I depart on my Eastern Europe road trip in about a month!

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USA – Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah – Part 1 of 2

In September 2017 my Dad and I went on a one week trip to the USA to explore the beautiful scenery that Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah have to offer. I started my blog series in 2016 but due to 2017 being such a busy year for travel I actually forgot to write about this.

2017 USA Road Trip

Our trip started and ended in Las Vegas, Nevada. The reason for us starting the trip here was the frequency of flights offered from our home city of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Non-stop flights can be had on Air Canada Rouge, WestJet for around $300-500 return if booked 45-90 days in advance. The savings can add up even more if you book a hotel and flight package.

We arrived on an evening flight and stayed at the Desert Rose Resort, which went for roughly $130 CDN a night back in 2017, but with a recent renovation has gone up to roughly $300 CDN a night. I can almost guarantee that you’ll get better value staying elsewhere now.

The next day we drove to Page, Arizona where we stayed the night. We had a few stops along the way at some nice slot canyons, but nothing as amazing as what we were going to visit the next day.

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Accommodation in Page was at the Motel 6 for roughly $60 CDN. For dinner we ate at State 48 Tavern, which I highly recommend. We both had burgers and beer.

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On Day 2 we woke up early and drove into the center of town to get picked up by Chief Tsosie Slot Canyon Tours to take us for a half day tour to Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon. When we used them they drove us out in 20 year old pickup trucks with cages in the back, but they have recently upgraded to very nice shuttles that have air conditioning. Either way I highly recommend them!

Antelope Canyon is a two separate slot canyons located near Page, Arizona. Upper Antelope Canyon is known as “The Crack” and Lower Antelope Canyon is known as the “Corkscrew”. The Navajo also refer to Upper Antelope Canyon as “the place where water runs through the rocks”, and Lower Antelope Canyon as “spiral rock arches”. The canyons are formed by the erosion of the Navajo Sandstone due to flash flooding. Rainwater during the monsoon season runs into the slot canyons, picks up speed, and over time erodes away the sandstone, thus deepening the canyons. Flash flooding can occur suddenly and care must be taken; one such incident occurred on October 30th 2006 for 36 hours, and caused the Tribal Park Authorities to close the Lower Antelope Canyon for five months!

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After exploring Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon we explored Horseshoe Bend, which was just a few minutes away. Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe shaped meander of the Colorado River. The river has an absolutely beautiful blue-green tinge to it.

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After visiting Horseshoe Bend we drove to Flagstaff where we stayed the night at the beautiful Courtyard by Marriott for about $165 CDN a night. At the time it had just opened a week prior and still had the new hotel smell (formaldehyde). For dinner we ate at Flagstaff Brewing Company. The food was okay, but fairly greasy. The beer was very good though!

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On Day 3 we drove to Albuquerque, stopping at the Puye Cliff Dwellings about 1.75 hours north of Albuquerque. I forget where we stayed to be honest. We stopped at Nemesis Brewing Company for dinner and some beers. The food was quite delicious and the beers were extremely delicious; they even had some IPA’s which are my beer of choice.

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Be sure to check back soon for Part 2 of 2 of this USA road trip!

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Lake Louise Ice Sculptures & Lussier Hot Springs

This weekend Julie and I embarked on another winter road trip. This weekend we drove to Lake Louise to look at the final day of the International Ice Sculpture contest that’s been held annually at Lake Louise for the past 26 years, spent a wonderful overnight stay in Radium at Radium Chalet, and then soaked in the natural Lussier Hot Springs.

The Lake Louise International Ice Sculpture contest has been held annually in January for the past 26 years. The world’s best ice carvers come every year to compete against one another. Ten teams of two are created and they compete head to head, usually to a specific theme, to create a masterpiece of art from 15 blocks of ice. This year the theme was open, which meant that the carvers could enjoy creative freedom.

My YouTube video of the Ice Carving can be viewed here!

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After enjoying our afternoon at Lake Louise we drove to Radium and checked into Radium Lodge, where we spent the evening relaxing, playing board games, and having a few beverages. Radium, also known as Radium Hot Springs, is a village of roughly 800 residents situated in Kootenay National Park in British Columbia.

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The next morning we woke up at 8:00am, had a continental breakfast (which was included), and drove to Lussier Hot Springs to soak and relax before heading back to Calgary to meet with some friends to go bowling and have hot wings in the evening.

Lussier Hot Springs is a natural undeveloped Sulphur hot spring located inside Whiteswan Lake Provincial Park in British Columbia. It is about a one hour drive southeast of Invermere. The springs are made up of five rock pools with gravel bottoms. The hottest pool at the inlet is 43°C, and the coolest pool us about 37°C nominally, but we experienced it to be much cooler; perhaps about 20°C. The water flows through the pools and into the Lussier River.

The use of the hot springs dates back to roughly 5000 years ago when the Ktunaxa native people used the area for seasonal hunting. During the 1800’s and 1900’s trappers, guides, and prospectors used the hot springs to sooth their bodies after a long days work.

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Abraham Lake

Last weekend Julie and I took a road trip to visit Abraham Lake, located in the Kootenay Plains. The drive to Abraham lake took roughly 4 hours via Rocky Mountain House on Highway 11. Abraham Lake is a photographers paradise because trapped methane causes frozen bubbles to form under the ice on the lake’s surface. The methane is formed from decaying plants on the lake bed. The methane gas ends up becoming trapped within the ice, in suspension, just below the surface of the lake as it begins to freeze.

Abraham Lake is actually an artificial lake and Alberta’s largest reservoir. The lake has a surface area of nearly 54 square kilometers and was created in 1972 by the former Calgary Power Company (now known as TransAlta) when the Bighorn Dam was constructed. The lake was built on the upper course of the North Saskatchewan River and is used to feed the 120 MW hydroelectric Bighorn power plant. The lake received its name from a contest that the Government of Alberta sponsored in 1972, during the final stage of construction of the Bighorn Dam. Students across the province submitted names to be taken into consideration. The lake was named after Silas Abraham, an inhabitant of the Saskatchewan River valley in the nineteenth century.

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After visiting Abraham Lake we drove to Banff to soak in the Banff Hot Springs by continuing to drive along Highway 11 to where it meets up with Highway 93N, and then looped around to Banff that way.

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Waterton Lakes National Park & Lundbreck Falls

Last weekend my girlfriend Julie and I visited Lundbreck Falls and Waterton Lakes National Park. It was a fairly chilly day with a lot of wind, so our time outside was limited.

Lundbreck Falls is a waterfall of the Crowsnest River and is located in Southwest Alberta in the Crowsnest Pass. The twin waterfalls were absolutely beautiful! It shocked me because it was a lot smaller in person than the pictures depicted. Being half frozen it was a unique perspective compared to many of the pictures that I had seen online. I would like to come back in the summer to see it completely thawed.

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The next stop was Wateron Lakes National Park, which I had not visited since right after the great fire of 2017, and never in the Winter. Much has changed in the park since the fire with many buildings still completely gone, and many still being rebuilt. The view of Cameron Falls half frozen was also quite spectacular.

Waterton Lakes National Park is located in Southwest Alberta. It borders Glacier National Park in Montana, USA. Waterton was the fourth Canadian National Park that was founded; being former in 1895. The park offers beautiful iconic views of the rocky mountains as well as some premier hikes such as Crypt Lake Trail and Bertha Falls.

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Rocky Mountains Winter 2019

Winter is coming… wait… winter is here!!! Over the last few weeks we have visited many snowy locations in the Rocky Mountains including; Emerald Lake, Lake Louise, Banff, Johnston Canyon, and Kananaskis (Rawson Lake). The crisp winter air certainly takes your breath away, but the views do too! Take a look at the absolutely splendid views that we have right in our very own backyard!

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