Iguazu Falls

We spent our second last day of our South American trip exploring Iguazu Falls. In my personal opinion the Argentinian side is much better than the Brazilian side. About 80% of Iguazu Falls is on the Argentinian side and I feel the views are much better.

We woke up early so we could get a good head start on the day, but the weather had a different idea for us. There was torrential downpour that delayed our departure until approximately 10:00am. There was so much rain coming down that the pool overflowed and the restaurant where we eat our breakfast was starting to flood.

Eventually at 10:00am we set off and took a local bus for 130 Argentinian Pesos per person ($4.25 CDN) to Iguazu Falls. The bus ride took about 30 minutes. Expect to pay the same amount on your return trip.

The entrance cost to the Argentinian side is 700 Argentinian Pesos ($23 CDN). There are 3 routes on the Argentinian side (Lower Loop, Upper Loop, and The Devil’s Throat), as well as a boat trip to San Martin Island, but the boat trip was not operating today as the water levels were too low. We completed the routes in the following order: Upper Loop, The Devil’s Throat, and then finally the Lower Loop). Looking back at it I think we completed it in the right order because it was still raining when we arrived and I found the Upper Loop had the least exciting views of the three.

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After completing the Upper Loop we were hungry so we decided to grab some food from the fast food restaurant near the middle of the park. We both ordered some cheeseburgers. The cheeseburgers caught the interest of the local Capuchin monkeys and coati’s. Coati’s are similar to raccoons and are equally as annoying despite being cute.

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The sun was starting to come out and the rain had dried up by the time we started to walk to the Devil’s Throat. The experience and views are out of this world. You can hear the roar of the falls and the amount of mist coming from the falls is incredible. We became completely drenched in water from the mist, as well as my camera!

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After completing the Devil’s Throat we walked the Lower Loop, which in my opinion provided the most impressive views of Iguazu Falls. On this loop you really get to experience how large and impressive these falls are.

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The Brazilian side just has the one route and takes about an hour to complete. You can almost walk right into the Devil’s Throat on the Brazilian side so you’ll be sure to get soaked. The Brazilian side keeps you mostly further away but you can get some pretty decent panoramic shots. The entrance cost on the Brazilian side is 63 reals ($21.50 CDN).

After exploring Iguazu Falls we went back to our hotel to pack for our return flight home the next day. I tried to check in to the flight and had difficulty as it said the flight couldn’t be found. I had to phone Avianca and Air Canada and spent numerous hours on the phone and was up quite late trying to figure it out. Avianca is in financial hardship and had to return about 30 percent of its fleet the previous week and because of this they cancelled our Iguazu Falls to Sao Paulo flight and didn’t notify me. Air Canada (Avianca’s partner) told me to just show up at the airport tomorrow and see what they can do for us.

Smart Travel Tips 2.0

I’ve been asked by quite a few people on how I’m always able to get such a good deal on flights, and how I can afford to fly Business/First class or get so much leg room. It’s actually not too hard with a bit of planning and a bit of work. I’ll do my best to explain and if anyone has any questions they can just message me. This Smart Travel Tips 2.0 section has been updated for 2019 and includes multiple new additions since my original 2017 post so be sure to read.

Good Deals on Flights

1. I tend to travel off season, so flights usually cost about half as much as they usually would peak season. I have the flexibility at my work place to be able to travel during slow times, or ask for permission to take time off at a specific time. I usually schedule my trips around these slow times, and on the shoulder seasons where I’m travelling to. For example, this next trip I’m going to France in March… when very few travel there, but its still warm enough to be able to enjoy my trip.

2. I use a multitude of different websites in my flight selection process, but I usually start with Google Flights to get a general idea of the path I’m going to take, or the airline I’m going to take. Expedia, which most people use, is actually typically the most expensive, and sometimes by quite a long shot. I usually get the best deal from the airline itself, or on Google Flights. The advantage to booking with the airline itself is that if for some reason you have any issues, or you need to cancel they can usually take care of it for you for free, or for a very minimal cost. Places like Expedia are way less forgiving. One such example of a good deal was when I travelled to Australia in 2016; Expedia wanted $1750, and I paid $900 with Air Canada on their website.

3. Another way of getting good deals on flights is to book one way tickets with Skiplagged. Skiplagged works by finding loopholes in airfare pricing, such as hidden-cities, to find deals that you won’t get elsewhere. So how does it work? Let’s say if I want to travel from Calgary to Toronto on August 18th and the cheapest direct flight I can find is $375… Skiplagged found a flight to Atlanta via Toronto for $240. I have saved $135. I just get off in Toronto and throw away the Atlanta portion of the ticket. There are some caveats here; you have to travel carryon only, and you can’t use your frequent flyer points because when they figure out you’ve done this they can garnish your points.

4. A few websites that I use to obtain killer deals on economy and business class seats are www.momondo.com and www.expertflyer.com. Momondo functions similar to Google Flights but provides different alternatives than Google does. Expert Flyer essentially is an elite travel hack of how to obtain the cheapest economy, business, or first class seat on a given airline for a given route. A premium membership offers you the most customizability and only costs $10 USD/mth or $100 USD/year and is highly worth it. I recently flew Calgary to Santiago, and then Sao Paulo to Calgary on Business Class for a tick above $2000 CDN. My fellow aviator Sam Chui has a fantastic explanation of how Expertflyer and Momondo works on this YouTube video.

Legroom in Economy

I use a wonderful website called http://www.seatguru.com to help me with my selection. I select the airline and type of plane that I’m going to be flying on (be careful if the airline has 2 or more configurations for the same type of plane!). I usually pick a seat in emergency exit rows, or at bulkhead areas because they allow the most leg room by far. You’re not allowed to store anything under the seat in front of you during takeoff and landing, and the first row of emergency exit seats doesn’t recline, but the back row does, so always select the back row if there are two emergency exit rows.

Business/First Class Seats

I never ever pay full price for business/first class seats. There are a few ways of obtaining these highly sought after seats while only paying a fraction of the cost, and in some cases getting it for free.

1. You can actually get the seats for free sometimes if the flight isn’t too full and you just ask the front desk very politely. You’ll have more a chance of success if you’re dressed to impressed, and not in sweat pants and wearing a shirt saying Budweiser. They want to try to keep the caliber of clientele up there to a reasonably high level, but I guess if you’re paying $5000-10000 for a seat and want to wear a Budweiser shirt then that’s your own choice and they can’t stop you.

2. There’s something most airlines offer called Bidding Upgrades, where you can actually bid a value that you’d be willing to pay for a Business/First class seat if it is still available 48-72 hours before the flight is scheduled to leave. There is always a minimum low value, and a max value. I always select the lowest value which can be as low as $200ish. If I don’t get the upgrade at that lowest bid price, then so be it, but to date I’ve always been upgraded at the lowest value. I’ve used this bidding with Air Canada, Lufthansa, Icelandair, Thai Airways, United, and Westjet (Economy Plus only of Westjet).

Travel Light

I travel exceptional light, which saves hundreds of dollars every year because I’m not having to pay for baggage fees. It also allows me to just grab my bag, get off the plane, and start my adventure. There’s no waiting for your bag… if it ever even arrives. The last 3 times I’ve checked my bag it has not shown up… I always use Osprey bags because they have a lifetime warranty, are super comfortable, and are extremely practical. My last blog post I went into detail of how I pack, and what bag I use, so I’ll refer you back to that blog post.

Pack Your Own Food

If I am travelling on economy I always pack my own food. Who in their right mind would pay $12 for a club sandwich? I usually bring protein bars, banana’s, a collapsible refillable water bottle, and if it’s a long flight I’ll make a sandwich, or if I’m feeling lazy pickup Subway for $5.

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Chile – Days 14 & 15 – Travel Days

The next two days were mainly travel days. We had to drive back to Punta Arenas, fly to Santiago, sleep overnight, fly to Buenos Aires, and then fly to Iguazu Falls. We were supposed to be able to sleep in but unfortunately our heater in the loft wasn’t working so we both woke up at 7:30am fairly cold. I used the oven to heat the place by turning it on and leaving the door open. We decided to have a lazy morning and hung around the loft until 11:00am when it was time to check out.

We drove back to Punta Arenas and experienced intermittent rain along the way. It looked as if anyone who was hiking in Torres Del Paine was going to have a very wet day because the clouds in that direction were very dark.

Once we arrived in Punta Arenas we decided that we wanted some ramen or Vietnamese food. We found a hole in the wall place that served Korean noodles, but they only accepted cash and we decided it was too much of a hole in the wall. Across the street was a restaurant called Gyros Pizza. We both shared a Hawaiian pizza, which was absolutely delicious. I also had an americano coffee as I was starting to fall asleep.

After lunch we went for a 12km walk along the beach front, which was very relaxing. After the walk it was time to head to the airport, drop off our truck and kill some time. When I returned the truck there was nobody to inspect it so I was told to just leave it and they would clear my receipt. Turns out three weeks later after the trip I am still in a dispute with my credit card company and Europcar because they double charged me for the truck. I had prepaid for the vehicle before the trip and they were supposed to just have a $800USD deposit that would be removed when I returned the truck. Turns out they actually charged my credit card for the cost of the vehicle even though I had already paid in full.

While waiting for the flight to Santiago we found out that the flight was delayed about 45 minutes. We managed to make up most of that delay once we were in the air. The view on takeoff was absolutely incredible. The flight landed at 11:30pm. We parked at a remote stand and had to take a fairly long bus ride to the terminal, which was perfect because I had to figure out how to order us an Uber, since it’s quite different at Santiago airport than other places because its still not technically legal in the country.

Ordering the Uber was the same; you just use the app, but that’s where things differ. Barbara, our Uber drive, texted me on the Uber app and told me she was behind me and to board the parking lot shuttle bus and then she would talk to me on the bus. She was super friendly and we took the parking lot shuttle bus to the parking lot where we walked to her car. She explained to me that they have to keep a low profile at Santiago Airport because authorities were cracking down on Uber drivers, who were not supposed to be there. When we got into her car she had quite the setup to communicate with foreigners. One phone was dedicated to Uber and the other was dedicated to Google Translate communications.

The drive to Hotel Diego de Almagro Aeropuerto was short and sweet and Barbara was extremely nice. After checking into the hotel we went to bed immediately as we had to get up at 4:45am the next day.

The next day we woke up at 4:45am, quickly got dressed, and had some buffet breakfast before boarding the shuttle to the airport for our flight to Iguazu Falls via Buenos Aires. Before boarding our flight we had to clear immigration to leave the country. The lineup at the immigration booth was about an hour long, but the process was simple. Before boarding the LATAM Airbus A320 flight to Buenos Aires I tried to get some Argentinian Pesos at the foreign exchange, but they were out of currency. I was starting to get a bit concerned about obtaining Argentinian Pesos as nowhere in Calgary had any, nor did Chile… more on that fun adventure later…

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We arrived in Buenos Aires after a moderately turbulent flight. We had a two hour layover and had some food and a drink before boarding our next LATAM Airbus A320 flight to Iguazu Falls, Argentina. An interesting thing to note about Buenos Aires AEP airport is that it sits right next to a beach so you can see people hanging out on the beach sunbathing. The next flight was less turbulent and arrived on time. After arriving at Iguazu Falls and the aircraft door was opened we were greeted with 37 Celsius weather and tons of humidity. It felt really nice as we had just spent a week in Patagonia where it was cold, dry and windy.

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After deplaning into the terminal I searched for a bank machine and found the only one in the terminal. Of course this was too good to be true because when I put my card in and requested any denomination of Argentinian Pesos I was greeted with the message of “ATM out of cash”. At this point in time I decided that we would have to find a way to get to our hotel with only credit or debit. Uber was ousted from the Iguazu area by the taxi commission a few years ago so that left us with having to take a taxi. There was only one taxi company that said they took credit or debit so I picked them. All taxi companies have a flat rate of 700 Argentinian Pesos to the main city.

When we were only a few blocks away from the hotel the taxi driver pulled into a gas station and told me I would be buying her gasoline as she doesn’t have a credit / debit machine. I thought it was really weird at first but then told the taxi driver that I will not be paying for more than 700 pesos. She gave me a very dirty look and started to talk in Spanish to the service station agent. After fueling the taxi we were dropped off at our hotel; Boutique Hotel de la Fonte. The hotel beautiful, but fairly dated. You could tell that it was once an extremely prosperous place.

From my research and talking with others it appears that Argentina is going through economic decline, where as Chile is actually doing really well. Their roles over the last decade have reversed as Chile used to be a fairly impoverished country. Argentina’s economy is being eroded due to political instability and corruption and the locals are suffering. It’s extremely difficult to obtain cash because the citizens of Argentina have lost trust in the local banks due to devaluing currency. They panic and take out all their money, leaving the machines empty.

After settling into the hotel for a bit we decided to go explore the town and get some dinner. We came across a quaint Italian restaurant called Il Fratello. I had vegetable lasagna and Catherine had herbed chicken with pumpkin infused mashed potatoes. Both meals were exquisite.

After dinner we found a bank machine that actually had some money in it. I took out 4000 Pesos ($130 CDN) and was charged 385 pesos ($13 CDN) to take it out, which is extremely expensive. Most countries charge $1-5 but this was the most that I had ever seen. Either way I was happy to have cash as I would need it for tomorrow and to also buy some bottled water. We stopped at a convenience store and tried to purchase a few bottles of water for tomorrow, but the store owner didn’t have enough change for my 1000 peso bills. I ended up having to buy four bottles of water, some bottles of beer, and some ice cream just to purchase enough items to receive change. He even had to go into his own wallet, and the next days float to have enough change to give me.

After arriving back at the hotel we swam in the pool and were greeted with a welcome drink of champagne. Catherine started to not feel well, but I was feeling better at this point in time. We had a lazy evening before heading to bed. Tomorrow we explore Iguazu Falls on the Argentinian side.

This concludes my Chile series, but I have two posts left for Argentina/Brazil that will be debuting sometime this week.

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Chile – Day 12 – Torres Del Paine National Park

Today I woke up at 7:00am. Catherine was still sleeping so I made us some coffee as well as some cheese and eggs on toast for us. Once I had made breakfast I woke Catherine up and we had breakfast together. After breakfast I made us some salami, cheese and avocado sandwiches for our lunch later on. We quickly got ready and hopped into the truck for a 2 hour drive to Torres Del Paine National Park. During our drive the scenery just kept getting more beautiful.

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Torres Del Paine National Park encompasses mountains, glaciers, lakes and rivers in the southern Chilean Patagonia and is known for its three massive granite peaks, which are actually an eastern spur of the Andes mountains. The park receives about 250,000 visitors each year and is a very popular hiking destination in Chile. I would absolutely come back here to hike more than the one hike that I did here, and would easily spend a week or two here just hiking.

The entrance to Torres Del Paine is setup similar to a passport office but has multiple steps. “Step 1” has a booth where you fill out a double sided piece of paper with a lot of your personal information, including your address as well as your passport number. After you fill out the paper you take it to “step 2” which stamps the paper and takes your money; in this case 21000 Chilean Pesos ($42.30 CDN) for 3 days of entry. “Step 3” involves taking your stamped piece of paper over to a different desk where they will stamp it again with a different stamp and provide you with instructions and a very detailed map.

After checking into the park we slowly drove to Mirador Condor Trail (a hike I wanted to do), while taking multiple stops for photos. We arrived at the Mirador Condor Trailhead at about 10:30am. The hike takes about 1.5 to 2 hours return and has an elevation gain of roughly 200 metres over 4km (2km each way) and has a beautiful view from the top overlooking Pehoe Lake. When we started the hike the sky was fairly clear except around the three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range but the temperature was a cool 15 degrees Celsius. We were both wearing jackets when we started the hike, but I quickly took my jacket off because I was starting to get hot. Catherine kept hers on the entire time because she is usually always too cold.

Half way up to the viewpoint we noticed the wind started picking up, but we had no idea what we were in for until we actually got to the top. At the top we could barely stand up and we later learned in the day the top regularly sees 160 kph winds, which is very substantial. At the top I took the opportunity to make some hilarious faces with the wind morphing my mouth into all sorts of ungodly positions. The viewpoint is absolutley breathtaking. On one side you see the beautiful shimmering turquoise coloured Pehoe Lake and on the other side you see the remains of a 2011-2012 fire that an Israeli backpacker deliberately set by lighting up some paper rolls. The fire burned 176 square kilometers of the reserve, destroying 36 square kilometers of native forest, which you can see in my photographs. The Israeli government sent in reforestation experts to the park and has committed to donate trees to replant the affected areas.

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While on our way down from the top we ran into an older couple named Martin and Sophie who were visiting from the Netherlands. We talked for a bit and then realized that we were going to be on the same Lago Grey glacier tour tomorrow. After talking for a bit I was really starting to deteriorate because of my cold and being out in the cold wind so we head back towards the truck. The return only took about 30 minutes and we even saw some condor birds on the way down; they’re huge!

Once we arrived at the truck we were both quite hungry so we ate the salami, cheese and avocado sandwiches that I made for lunch. We continued on driving throughout the park stopping at multiple lookouts and doing short hikes. Another one of my favorite stops was the Salto Grande waterfall. It’s not a very large waterfall but the colours were absolutely stunning.

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We ended up leaving the park at around 5:30pm and arrived back at our loft around 7:30pm. On the way back we passed Puerto Natales airport where I saw a BAE-146 (Avro RJ-100) taking off. These old workhorses are a dying bread and most have come to South America to spend their last years before they get turned into scrap metal. Many work for the airline DAP which flies to Antarctica.

Catherine made us some pasta with chicken and some red sauce for dinner. I wasn’t feeling too good so we laid in bed and watched “The Impossibles” movie. I’m surprised that I had never seen the 2movie before but it was actually pretty good and is based on a true story on a family that was affected by the 2004 Thailand floods.

Chile – Day 1 – Travel Day & Santiago

I have to start of with an apology for a half month delay for this travel series. Internet connectivity was questionable at the majority of places we visited, and I was combating a very nasty flu which left me with little energy to write. Anyways, let the adventure begin!

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Today was mostly a travel day for us. We woke up at 8am, got ready and my dad drove us to the airport. We travelled from Calgary to Toronto on one of Air Canada’s last Boeing 767-300ER flights before they are retired from mainline service to Air Canada Rouge; a low-cost subsidiary of Air Canada. The flight departed Calgary at 11:45am and we arrived in Toronto at 5:15pm. After a 2 hour layover in Toronto we departed for Santiago on Air Canada’s flagship Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner. The flight arrived the next morning at 8:45am.

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After landing in Santiago we went through customs, which was actually a fairly painless experience contrary to what I had read online. After clearing customs we boarded a Centropuerto Bus that took us to the city center station of Los Heros for only $3.20/pp. Once we reached Los Heros we took the Red Metro line ($1.30/pp trip) to Manuel Montt station, which was right below our hotel; the ibis Providencia. We checked into the hotel and had a quick two hour nap before venturing out into the city.

After waking up from our nap we walked along the Mapocho River, which was extremely turbid and fast flowing. The river led us to the beautiful community of Bellavista, where we stopped at the Fukai Sushi restaurant and ordered some sushi rolls. We tried three unique rolls that we’ve never had before; Guacamole Rolls, Baked Brie Rolls, and Seared Salmon with Almond Slivers. We’ll call this lunch/dinner since it was about 3 in the afternoon.

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After having our meal we walked to Funicular de Santiago, which took us to the top of San Cristobal Hill. The funicular was opened in 1925 and definitely shows its age. The views provided from the top of the hill are absolutely fascinating. We had 360 degree views of the entire city, including one of my favorite of the newest flagship building in Santiago; Gran Torre Santiago, which is a 300 metre tall skyscraper that towers over the city. Gran Torre was completed in 2013 and is the tallest building in South America. Also at the top of the hill was Virgin of the Immaculate Conception (Virgin Mary).

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Instead of taking the funicular back down the hill we opted to take the gondola across the hill and down the other side, exiting near the Gran Torre. We ended up walking around a bit before taking the Red Metro line to Baquedano station, where we got off to get ourselves some of the famous ice cream from Heladeria Emporio La Rosa. C had I both had two scoops of Ice Cream. C had Raspberry & Pineapple, while I had Vanilla & Cookies and Cream. It was starting to get late and we were tired so we walked past Santa Lucia Hill before walking back to the hotel. We walked a total of 23km today, which our feet and bodies definitely felt considering we only got 1.5 hours of sleep on the plane as well as a two hour nap.

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Revisiting Peru

In 2014 I had the wonderful opportunity to visit the beautiful country of Peru with my father. I have quite a few friends visiting Peru in 2019/2020 so I figured I’d write a blog post describing my travels from what I can remember. I’ll explain via Q&A format as that’s probably the most palatable format for most people.

Do I Need a VISA?

If you’re visiting from Canada or the USA then you do not require a VISA.

How Long Should I Go For?

I recommend 10-14 days for a first time visit. We went for 10 days and it felt like the right amount of time, although some people may find that rushed. My father and I are go-go-go people so 10 days felt perfect.

What Vaccinations Should I Get?

There are no mandatory vaccines required for entry into Peru, but its recommended that you get Hepatitis A & B, and Yellow Fever (depending on the area of travel). I only had Hepatitis A & B when I travelled. I also recommend you bring Dukoral because I was the unfortunate victim to “muddy butt” (self explanatory) on the last day of my travels because we ate at a local restaurant that had food that came in contact with contaminated water. Let’s just say I had a very unpleasant week after that…

How Do You Get To Peru From Calgary?

The easiest way to get to Lima, Peru from Calgary is one of two ways:

  • Calgary to Lima via Houston on United Airlines. Typical costs range around $1000-1200 for economy class.
  • Calgary to Lima via Dallas on American Airlines. This is the route choice that we chose. Typical costs range around $1000-1200 for economy class but business class tickets can be had for as little as $1200 in our case if you hunt around. South America is an anomaly for cheap business class tickets for some reason; sometimes business class tickets can be had for the same price, if not cheaper due to lack of demand. Remember the more open seats the cheaper the airfare is; once seats fill up the prices usually start to increase.

Once you get to Lima you’re more than likely going to want to head to Cuzco, which is operated by LATAM. LATAM is a Chilean holding company that operates the largest airline and subsidiaries in South America. LATAM operates in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Peru.

What Is The Weather Like?

In general Peru is pretty mild year round. I found Lima to be muggy in mid June despite it’s mild low to mid 20°C temperatures. Cusco and the Sacred Valley (including Machu Picchu) I found to be t-shirt weather during the day, and sweater weather at night. In fact some evenings in the Sacred Valley approached near 0°C at night!

What Should You Visit In Peru?

First time visitors will definitely want to head to the following locations (all followed with pictures)

  • Cusco
    • Cusco is a city in southeastern peru, near the Urubamba Valley of the Andes mountain range. The city has a population of just under 500,000 people and is located at an elevation of 11200 feet (3400 metres). I highly recommend bringing some altitude sickness pills if you suffer from altitude sickness. I don’t usually get hypoxia or altitude sickness so I did not require these pills. Cusco was the historic capitcal of the Incan Empire from the 13th to 16th century Spanish conquest. Cusco was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983, and it definitely is deserving of this heritage title as there are manly beautiful architecturally significant sites around the city. I highly recommend exploring the local markets.

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  • Machu Picchu
    • Machu Picchu is an Incan citadel set high in the Andes Mountains in Peru, above the Urubamba River valley. This is the main attraction in Peru. Machu Picchu was built in the 15th century and later abandoned. It’s renowned for its sophisticated dry-stone walls that fuse huge blocks without the use of mortar, intriguing buildings that play on astronomical alignments and panoramic views.
    • To get to Machu Picchu we took the “Sacred Valley” PeruRail train from Urubamba to the base of Machu Picchu, where we boarded a tour coach to take us to the top of Machu Picchu.
    • When at the base of Machu Picchu I highly recommend exploring the base city as its filled with amazing markets, affordable accommodation and great food.

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  • Urubamba
    • Urubamba is the largest town in the Sacred Valley region of southeastern Peru. It is a busy transportation hub and sits on the Urubamba River, surrounded by rugged mountains. There is a popular market selling fresh fruit and vegetables and also pots, pans, and other essential items. The market does not really cater to tourists, but we chose to explore it anyways. We aware of people wanting money for taking photographs. I managed to get a picture of a badass Llama wearing sunshades!

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  • Sacsayhuaman (pronounced Sexy Woman… I’m not kidding)
    • Sacsayhuaman is a citadel on the northern outskirts of the city of Cusco, Peru, the historic capital of the Inca Empire.

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  • Maras
    • Maras is a town near the city of Cusco in the Sacred Valley of southeastern Peru. It’s known for the Maras Salt Mines, thousands of individual salt pools on a hillside, dating back to Incan times. West of the town is Moray, an Inca archaeological site on a high plateau featuring a series of concentric terraces.

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2018-08-19 – Still Travelling to Kenya

Today my journey to Nairobi, Kenya continues. I deliberately slept in until 11:30am so that I could start to get acclimatized to Nairobi’s time zone. I took the Hilton airport shuttle to Toronto Pearson International Airport, had a burrito from Freshii, which was actually pretty good, and then checked in for my flight as I was unable to do so online. After checking in for my flight I went through security and sat down at this place called Beer Hive and ordered a Muskoka Brewery Mad Tom IPA. I took some pictures of planes while I was waiting for my Jet Airways India flight to Amsterdam.

I try to be as positive as possible about my travel experiences but Jet Airways India is a pretty lousy airline. The Boeing 777 was 10 abreast instead of the typical 9, the interior was very worn and dated including the seat cushions, and the onboard service was deplorable. They’ve in the news lately because they’re concerned they will not have enough money to continue operating past the end of August as their main financial backer; Etihad has decided not to continue funding the failing airline. Perhaps if they spent more money on providing a quality experience then perhaps people would fly them.

Anyways onto the positives; upon arrival in Amsterdam, which is an absolutely wonderful airport, I went and checked in to a cute pod hotel called YOTEL. I had four hours of sleep before boarding the next and final leg of my flights to Nairobi, Kenya. The pod had an extremely comfortable mattress and a nice thick duvet on top. It felt nice with the air conditioning blasted but having a thick duvet on. When I woke up I was able to shower in my own mini personal shower in the pod.

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The flight from Amsterdam to Nairobi was on a KLM Boeing 747-400M, which is actually the last Boeing I needed to fly on to complete my list of Boeing jetliners except for the Boeing 720. This marks a milestone for my last Boeing Jet, and my last continent except Antarctica. The KLM flight was about 1 hour late departing due to a failed emergency battery, but the pilot was exceptionally communicative the entire time. The onboard experience was perfect; the staff were super friendly and attentive, the food was amazing, and the seat was very comfortable. I got chatting with the crew on the flight and was invited to explore the upper deck, galley;s, and crew rest area. The flight was very smooth as well; probably even smoother than flying on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. It was a true joy flying on the Queen of the Skies!

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The plane parked on the tarmac upon our late arrival so we had to take a bus to the terminal. Once inside the terminal it was a quick walk to immigration/customs where I only had to wait about 15 minutes to get my passport stamped. It saves a ton of time if you have you e-visa beforehand. I just needed to get my fingerprints and photograph taken. After clearing immigration/customs I was met by my GoWay Travel representative named Justar. She’s a delightful young lady who moved to Nairobi two years ago after graduating with her bachelor of arts. She will be my tour guide in 2-days time.

Tomorrow is a day of relaxation and exploring the Central Business District of Nairobi. Make sure to check back tomorrow for my next blog post!